Booming legal Amazon wildlife trade documented in new report

Spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) skin is the most highly traded wildlife commodity coming out of the Amazon. Nearly 800,000 skins are exported annually, mainly from captive breeding centers in Colombia. Major importers are Singapore, Mexico, and Thailand. This is one finding in a new report that analyzes trade in CITES-listed species from Amazon countries for the first time. Photo by Kevin Law used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license The multimillion-dollar legal wildlife trade in species originating from Amazonian countries has been analyzed in detail for the first time.

Border bust leads to arrests in alleged human smuggling case

The U.S. Border Patrol said Wednesday it thwarted a large-scale human trafficking operation that sought to bring 15 people from Guatemala and Mexico into the country illegally. Three men are being held without bail, including the alleged driver, while the rest have been turned over to immigration authorities. The bust occurred in Derby near the U.S.-Canadian border early Sunday. A border marker along the slash east of Richford. Photo by Elizabeth Hewitt/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?fit=300%2C201&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?fit=610%2C408&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?resize=300%2C201&ssl=1" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?resize=300%2C201&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?resize=125%2C84&ssl=1 125w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?resize=768%2C514&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?resize=610%2C408&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?resize=150%2C100&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/DSC_0763.jpg?w=1024&ssl=1 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1">A border marker.

Border Patrol agent arrested for lewd conduct with minor

Pima County Sheriff's deputies arrested a Border Patrol agent at the Ajo Station two weeks ago based on a fugitive warrant issued by officials in California for charges of lewd and lascivious acts with a minor in 2013.

Border Report: ‘Their Options Are to Build Up a New Life’

For the past five years, Gaston Cazares, an undocumented immigrant living in Carlsbad, had been routinely checking in with Immigration and Customs Enforcement in hopes of avoiding deportation. Cazares, who first arrived in the U.S. almost 30 years ago, is married and has two children — a daughter attending Scripps Ranch High, and a son who has autism, according to Tribune Media. He had been the family breadwinner, paid taxes and had no other criminal record. His son's condition had allowed Cazares to obtain a stay of removal. But when Cazares went in for his annual check-in back in April, things had changed.

Border Report: No One Wall to Solve it All

The centerpiece of President Donald Trump's plan to make America great again begins in San Diego – 13 miles east of the Pacific Ocean, to be exact. That's where six companies from across the country are competing for a future contract to build a big, beautiful wall. As of last Wednesday, five prototypes were completed. The rest is expected to be completed in the next two weeks. After construction wraps up, Customs and Border Protection will help assemble teams to see which prototypes are hardest to scale over, dig under or break through.

Boston Archdiocese, Catholic Parishioners Battle Over Church Eviction

When walking into the front vestibule of St. Frances Xavier Cabrini Church in the seaside town of Scituate, Mass. it doesn't look or sound like the average church."What the hell are you doing," an actor from The Young and the Restless shouts on a big screen TV. Two recliners are set up in front of it, all right next to a stained glass window.Nancy Shilts is one of more than 100 parishioners who have taken turns holding vigil in the church, night and day, since the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston announced nearly 11 years ago it wanted to close the church."We have a TV here.

Bostonians Seek A Stronger Attack on ‘Methadone Mile’

On “Methadone Mile,” a stretch of Boston's Massachusetts Avenue south of downtown where methadone clinics, sober homes and other drug treatment services have grown in the shadow of Boston Medical Center, an area meant for healing has instead become the city's most visible symbol of the national opioid crisis, the Associated Press reports. Mayor Marty Walsh promised to clean up the notorious drug haven last year, launching initiatives to break up the dealing and connect people to treatment. The slow pace of change has frustrated residents and business owners, who believe more dramatic steps need to be taken. “It's just really sad,” said George Stergios of the local neighborhood association. “Most of us don't want to live like this, surrounded by human misery.” Walsh believes “significant gains” are being made.

Botanical Garden’s Expansion Adds New Dimension to Cultural Corridor

The highly anticipated eight-acre expansion of the San Antonio Botanical Garden is the latest enhancement to the Broadway cultural corridor. The post Botanical Garden's Expansion Adds New Dimension to Cultural Corridor appeared first on Rivard Report.

Boxing in America

Author to discuss book on heavyweightsBoxing in America was first posted on October 16, 2017 at 7:16 am.

BP agent found guilty of stealing gun parts from federal armory

A Border Patrol agent was found guilty of stealing more than $100,000 in gun parts from a federal armory in West Virginia, including a device that modified a Glock pistol into a fully automatic weapon, and mailing them to Arizona.

Brainstorming the Future to Help Resolve Homelessness

How solutions-focused journalism can aid the dispossessed
Starting this fall, the Public Press is reporting on new and creative solutions to homelessness. And because we know we don't have all the answers, we're engaging the community to gather fresh ideas and inspire action. In January 2018, the Public Press will host a daylong conference, Solving Homelessness: A Community Workshop, in collaboration with other Bay Area news organizations to explore novel approaches through live events, social media and shoe-leather reporting. Reporting in this issue shifts the framing of homelessness to institutions, not just individuals; regional context, not just neighborhood woes; and possible futures, not just our present predicament. Most politicians, social service workers, businesspeople, activists and neighbors working on the issue are well-meaning, but they often disagree about solutions.

Brattleboro community rallies to protest local man’s deportation

(This story is by the Brattleboro Reformer, in which it first appeared Oct. 12, 2017.)
BRATTLEBORO — Community member Mamadou Bah was spirited away to Canada on Thursday to avoid being deported to his native Guinea West Africa, from where he fled in 2002. Bah had been told by U.S. Customs and Immigration Services to turn himself in on Thursday for his return to his native country. According to Lost River Racial Justice, which has been advocating for him to stay in Vermont, Mamadou was a political prisoner before fleeing Guinea in 2002. Bah's wife, Shawna Janelle Bah, posted on Facebook on Thursday afternoon that Canada gave her husband asylum and will allow him to stay until June 18.

Brattleboro Literary Festival turns personal and political

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Charles Simic speaks at a Brattleboro Literary Festival panel discussion titled “Poetry of Witness: Where the Personal Meets the Political — Writing and Witnessing in an Age of Resistance.” Photo by Kevin O'Connor/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?fit=610%2C458&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=610%2C458&ssl=1" alt="Brattleboro Literary Festival" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=610%2C458&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=125%2C94&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=768%2C576&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=1376%2C1032&ssl=1 1376w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=1044%2C783&ssl=1 1044w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=632%2C474&ssl=1 632w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?resize=536%2C402&ssl=1 536w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/VTD-Literary-Festival-5-1.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Former U.S. Poet Laureate Charles Simic speaks at a Brattleboro Literary Festival panel discussion titled “Poetry of Witness: Where the Personal Meets the Political — Writing and Witnessing in an Age of Resistance.” Photo by Kevin O'Connor/VTDiggerBRATTLEBORO — When Michelle Burford was growing up in Phoenix, she didn't know she'd go on to work the night shift at a Sears store in Colorado, earn a master's degree in educational psychology from Harvard University, become a founding editor of Oprah Winfrey's O magazine or help pen a string of best-selling celebrity memoirs. “I stumbled into the world of collaborative writing,” she says. “I love it, but didn't intend to be here.”
The Brattleboro Literary Festival is a celebration of stories. But those told by 60 novelists, poets and nonfiction writers at this weekend's annual event weren't limited to their books. The 15th anniversary program's most recognized name, Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Russo, read one of his latest essays — but only after remembering friend and fellow writer Howard Frank Mosher, the Northeast Kingdom novelist who died this year.

Brattleboro looks to ‘instigate’ small-business success

The logo for INSTIG8, a set of programs aimed at boosting entrepreneurship in the Windham County region, sits on a table Thursday at Brattleboro's Cotton Mill complex, where small-business owners talked about a new “Startup Lab.” Photo by Mike Faher/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?fit=610%2C458&ssl=1" src="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=610%2C458&ssl=1" alt="INSTIG8" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=610%2C458&ssl=1 610w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=125%2C94&ssl=1 125w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=768%2C576&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=1376%2C1032&ssl=1 1376w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=1044%2C783&ssl=1 1044w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=632%2C474&ssl=1 632w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?resize=536%2C402&ssl=1 536w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?w=1440&ssl=1 1440w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/INSTIG8.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">The logo for INSTIG8, a set of programs aimed at boosting entrepreneurship in the Windham County region, sits on a table Thursday at Brattleboro's Cotton Mill complex, where small-business owners talked about the new Startup Lab. Photo by Mike Faher/VTDiggerBRATTLEBORO – A few months ago, Chelsea Nunez quit her job and dove into the hard-knocks world of startup entrepreneurship. But she's had some assistance in getting her Brattleboro event-planning company – playfully called Nacho Average Events – off the ground. Nunez was one of several entrepreneurs graduating Thursday from the new Startup Lab in Brattleboro. It's part of a larger effort, called INSTIG8, aimed at encouraging and nurturing small businesses as the region attempts to recover from the loss of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant.

Brattleboro Museum & Art Center seeks original artwork and writing from Vermont teens

News Release — Brattleboro Museum & Art Center
October 16, 2017
Contact:
Sarah Freemansarah@brattleboromuseum.org
802-257-0124, ext. 102www.brattleboromuseum.org. Submissions now being accepted for annual Scholastic Art & Writing Awards
BRATTLEBORO, VT — The Brattleboro Museum & Art Center (BMAC) is now accepting submissions for the 2018 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, a prestigious national recognition initiative for teenagers with exceptional artistic and literary talent. Vermont students in grades 7-12 are invited to submit art and writing entries in dozens of categories, including ceramics, digital art, painting, photography, poetry, humor, science fiction, personal essay/memoir, and more. The submission deadline is December 14, 2017.

Brattleboro Retreat worker charged with child sexual assault of a patient

Brattleboro resident Robert Havens appeared with his attorney, Bettina Buehler, in Windham County Superior Court, Criminal Division, on Wednesday on charges of sexual assault, lewd and lascivious conduct with a child, kidnapping and unlawful restraint. Photo by Kristopher Radder/Brattleboro Reformer
" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?fit=300%2C207&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?fit=610%2C421&ssl=1" src="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?resize=610%2C421&ssl=1" alt="Robert Havens" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?resize=610%2C421&ssl=1 610w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?resize=125%2C86&ssl=1 125w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?resize=300%2C207&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?resize=768%2C529&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/REF-L-Court-Harmony-02.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Brattleboro resident Robert Havens appeared with his attorney, Bettina Buehler, in Windham County Superior Court, Criminal Division, on Wednesday on charges of sexual assault, lewd and lascivious conduct with a child, kidnapping and unlawful restraint. Photo by Kristopher Radder/Brattleboro Reformer(This story by Harmony Birch was published in the Brattleboro Reformer on Oct. 5, 2017.)
BRATTLEBORO — A mental health worker at the Brattleboro Retreat has been charged by police with sexually assaulting a minor while the victim was a patient at the Retreat. Robert Havens, 48, of Brattleboro, is being charged with sexual assault of a victim under the age of 16; lewd and lascivious conduct with a child; knowingly restraining a person with the intent of sexually assaulting the person; kidnapping a victim under the age of 16; and with taking, enticing or harboring a person without consent of the person's custodian.

Brattleboro Words unveils multi-year ‘People, Places and the History of Words in Brattleboro, Vermont’

News Release — Brattleboro Words
Oct. 1, 2017
Contact:
Lissa Weinmann / Prudence Baird
(802) 380-8388 or Email: brattleborowords@gmail.com
URL: http://www.brattleboro.com/words/
New Exploration into Our Shared Legacy Debuts with Two Exciting Exhibits This Month
Pop-Up Mini-Museum Debuts “Lucy Speaks' Lit. Fest Weekend October 14 and 15 and “Brattleboro's Letterpress Years” Opens at Brooks Memorial Library October 11
BRATTLEBORO, VT — October 1, 2017 — Under the auspices of a National Endowment for the Humanities matching grant, five local nonprofit organizations — Marlboro College, Brattleboro Literary Festival, Brattleboro Historical Society, Brooks Memorial Library, and Write Action — have joined forces to embark on a multi-year community journey to research and present the Brattleboro area's rich and undersung history of writing, publishing, printing and words. “People, Places and the History of Words in Brattleboro, Vermont” (Words Project) will produce podcasts and maps for bicycling, walking and driving tours, as well as a heritage book chronicling the four-year Project's findings, among other things. Two inaugural exhibitions ”Lucy Speaks” and “Brattleboro's Letterpress Years,” set to launch mid-October, herald three and a half more years of public activities that will engage community members, including teachers and their students, in place-based “research pods” that will investigate, share and celebrate Brattleboro's rich literary history from the Abenaki up to today.

Brazil: A World Champion in Political and Environmental Devastation (Commentary)

the Paraná state government and its state legislative assembly aim to reduce the Devonian Escarp Environmental Preserve by 70 percent. Photo by Jonathan Campos Brazil. The fifth largest country in the world. Besides housing the world's largest rainforest and freshwater reserves, — approximately 12 percent of the world's total — it is also the country with the largest commercial cattle production, with more than 215 million animals. Additionally, it has the world's largest production of soybeans, sharing the first place with the USA.

Brazil’s Journalists Seek Solutions to Fake News

Across the globe, the public's trust in the news media continues to decline. According to the 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer, 82 percent of 28 countries surveyed registered a decrease of trust in media from 2016 to 2017. Just 43 percent of those surveyed said they trust the media, down from 48 percent in 2016. “It is up to the press to reflect on this [distrust],” explained Sérgio Dávila, executive editor at Folha de S.Paulo, one of Brazil's biggest newspapers, during a panel about the “post-truth era” at the 12th Congress of Investigative Journalism in São Paulo this summer. “We are not immune to making mistakes, but we cannot be immune to self-criticism.”
“In a democratic society, we should disagree about some analyses, about some political issues, but we cannot disagree about facts.” — Martin BaronTo recover that trust, news organizations have to invest even more in investigative journalism and transparency, the panel agreed.

Breaking: Two students were stabbed, one fatally, at a Bronx school

One male student was fatally stabbed and another seriously wounded at a Bronx school Wednesday morning, officials said. The incident occurred at Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation in the West Farms section of the Bronx. The school shares a building with P.S. 67. An 18-year-old man was arrested at the school, police said. One of the victims was in critical condition at St.

Breakneck Summit

Two years later, what has been accomplished?Breakneck Summit was first posted on September 29, 2017 at 9:15 am.

Brian Pine: Outsider BT bidders carry risks

Editor's note: This commentary is by Brian Pine, of Burlington, a senior consultant at Vermont Energy Investment Corp., who formerly worked for the city's Community and Economic Development Office and served as a Burlington city councillor in the 1990s. I am thankful that our City Council set high standards for its due diligence in deciding the future of our telecommunications infrastructure. As we near a decision on a Burlington Telecom buyer, though, let's make sure the council and mayor weigh all of the risks and benefits. There has rightly been a focus on financial risk, but mostly on just one bidder – the Keep BT Local (KBTL) Cooperative. What are the risks with the outside bids, which are more than double the KBTL bid?

Brian Ricca: A safe and inclusive place for all students

Editor's note: This commentary is by Brian G. Ricca, who is superintendent of Montpelier Public Schools. During this past month, we welcomed back to Montpelier Public Schools all our students, pre-kindergarten through 12th graders. I spent a substantial amount of time in our classrooms, visiting with students and teachers as they returned to learn some new routines, meet classmates for the first time, reconnect with classmates they already know, and begin setting the foundation for growth and progress this year. When I welcomed our faculty and staff back to school in August, I urged them to ensure that every single student in Montpelier Public Schools felt safe and included. Not in a token way — but instead in a foundational way that encouraged all students to be exactly who they are, regardless of skin color, whom they love, or what gender they identify as.

Bridgeport resident weathers Maria in San Juan, but worries about recovery elsewhere

WASHINGTON — Concerned about his family and friends, Julio López Varona rushed from Bridgeport to Puerto Rico a few days before Hurricane Maria crushed the island. A day before President Donald Trump visits his homeland, López Varona says he's disappointed by the U.S. response, and worries about the fate of millions who don't live in the Puerto Rican capital of San Juan, which he calls "an oasis" because of its access to U.S. aid.

Brigadier Gen. Michel A. Natali to speak at Norwich University Veterans Day observance

News Release — Norwich University
Oct 19, 2017
Contact:
Daphne Larkin 802-485-2886dlarkin@norwich.edu
Follow us on Twitter @NorwichNewswww.norwich.edu
NORTHFIELD, Vt. –Norwich University will observe Veterans Day by conducting a Corps of Cadets review in honor of all veterans, past and present. The reviewing officer and guest speaker is Brigadier General Michel Natali, Norwich Class of 1987. Veterans, the public, and those currently serving in the Armed Forces of the United States are cordially invited to attend the Veterans Day Observance on the Upper Parade Ground at Norwich University on Friday, November 10, 2017, at 3:15 p.m.
The ceremony will include cannon fire in the Roll of Wars, a wreath laying, firing of three rifle volleys, and the playing of Echo Taps. Highlighting the event will be reviewing officer and guest speaker Brigadier General Michel Natali, New York Army National Guard.

Briggs leaves ‘acting’ behind, assumes presidency of Mississippi Valley State

MVSUDr. Jerryl Briggs, president at Mississippi Valley State University
A week following a campus visit by members of the Institutions of Higher Learning Board of Trustees, the board named Dr. Jerryl Briggs new president of Mississippi Valley State University. “Throughout the listening sessions held last week, we heard the Valley community say that the university's next president should be someone with vision, who will bring stability to the office and build on the current success,” said Shane Hooper, a board trustee and chair of the Valley search committee. “Dr. Briggs clearly has a commitment to the history, legacy, culture and mission of the university, as well as a vision for the future.”
Before being named acting president in June after Dr. William Bynum left Valley to take the leadership role at Jackson State University, Briggs served as executive vice president and chief operating officer at the school. He had direct oversight for the operations of the university. He has been an administrator at the university for four years.

Broadcasters, nonprofits send help to Puerto Rico

Public broadcasters are sending equipment and engineers to the hurricane-ravaged island this week, while nonprofits and foundations are organizing to combat government corruption amid the disaster.

Brooks Adds More Upscale Apartments to Housing Mix

The complex offers one- and two-bedroom apartments with amenities designed to match similar luxury developments throughout the city. The post Brooks Adds More Upscale Apartments to Housing Mix appeared first on Rivard Report.

Broward grand jury hears first witnesses in criminal probe of Broward Health

By Dan Christensen and Buddy NevinsFloridaBulldog.org
A Broward grand jury has begun hearing about alleged criminal conduct at long-troubled Broward Health, the taxpayer-supported public medical system for the northern two-thirds of the county. The post Broward grand jury hears first witnesses in criminal probe of Broward Health appeared first on Florida Bulldog.

Broward PD Finkelstein says bond court judge Hurley must go; Chief judge says no

By Dan Christensen, BrowardBulldog.org

Broward County Court Judge John “Jay” Hurley Photo: NBC6 Miami

John “Jay” Hurley, a Broward County judge who's gained a measure of online celebrity for his brand of televised justice, will keep his post in bond court despite a call for his removal by Broward Public Defender Howard Finkelstein. Finkelstein complained to Chief Judge Peter M. Weinstein last week in a letter that Hurley should be booted out of magistrate court for “expressing his contempt for the homeless and members of my office.”
Saying Hurley “has crossed the line,” Finkelstein asked Weinstein to transfer him in a letter recounting five incidents from October 7-15. DVD recordings that Finkelstein said depict “Judge Hurley's rash and troubling behavior” accompanied the four-page letter. “Each DVD shows Judge Hurley over-reacting, abusing his judicial authority and acting in a manner unbecoming a judicial officer,” Finkelstein wrote. “His behavior is clearly intended to bully and intimidate the attorneys and prevent them from effectively representing detainees.”
But in a Sunday telephone interview, Weinstein rejected Finkelstein's request.

Bryant asks Supreme Court to toss state flag suit, says lower courts got it right

A Mississippi lawyer has not sufficiently proven that he has been injured by the state's Confederate-themed state flag for the U.S. Supreme Court to hear his case, attorneys for Gov. Phil Bryant said in court filings. Carlos Moore, a black attorney in Grenada, sued Bryant in February arguing that the state flag is a symbol of white supremacy that harms Moore and his young daughter by violating the Constitution's guarantee of equal protection to all citizens. The Confederate battle emblem from the Civil War is emblazoned in a corner of the flag. Critics say the symbol is racist. Supporters say it represents the state's history.

Budget fight threatens credit for a third of CT municipalities

Moody's Investors Service announced measures that could lead to lower bond ratings — and higher interest costs — for 51 municipalities and six regional school districts, affecting nearly $7 billion in outstanding debt.

Budget resolutions advance as Sanders spearheads opposition

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and top congressional Democrats oppose the GOP budget resolution proposal. Photo by Elizabeth Hewitt/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Sanders" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9223.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and top congressional Democrats oppose the GOP budget resolution proposal. Photo by Elizabeth Hewitt/VTDiggerWASHINGTON — Both chambers of Congress moved forward on budget resolutions this week as GOP-led efforts to reform the federal tax system ramp up. Members of Vermont's delegation registered their opposition to the Republican plans, with Sen. Bernie Sanders leading efforts to spotlight what foes describe as a giveaway to the wealthiest Americans at the expense of popular programs.
By the time Congress adjourned Thursday, the Senate Budget Committee had passed its resolution out on a party-line vote of 12-11, paving the way for the legislation to go to the floor. The committee first spent hours debating amendments, many of them brought by members of the minority and ultimately defeated.

Buffalo and Rochester face cross-border competition for Amazon

Rochester and Buffalo have teamed up to make a bid for Amazon's second North American headquarters. Billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs are at stake. But the New York bid will get stiff competition from north of the border. WBFO Canada correspondent Dan Kapenchuk reports

Buffalo Opioid Court Fast-Tracks Addict Treatment

Federal, county and city court officials are looking at Buffalo, N.Y.'s new opioid crisis intervention court as a potential model solution to the epidemic of heroin and opioid overdoses that continue to devastate families and communities, taxing local governments, first responders and the criminal justice system, NPR reports. “Right now we're trying to save them. I'm trying to save their life,” says Judge Craig Hannah, who presides over the first-in-the-nation experiment that aims to fast-track addicts into wraparound treatment before adjudicating their criminal cases. “I want them to have another sunset, another time with their family, to see another Christmas.”
Buffalo's opiate court is an iteration of the traditional drug court where an addicted nonviolent offender is channeled into recovery as an alternative to jail and a chance at a reduced sentence. The necessity of a special opiate court underscores the crippling severity of the drug overdose and addiction crisis, which killed 64,000 Americans from February 2016 to February 2017.

Bullying Cited in First NYC School Killing in 20 Years

After a teenager was charged with killing another student in a New York City public school for the first time in more than 20 years, principals and parents grappled with the hazards of what appeared to be a bullying problem, the Wall Street Journal reports. Some educators reinforced the message that harassment can happen anywhere and students must be vigilant. Police said a dispute escalated during a morning history class at Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation in the Bronx on Wednesday. Abel Cedeño, 18, was charged with murder after allegedly stabbing a 15-year-old to death with a switchblade knife and seriously injuring a 16-year-old. Cedeño's lawyers at the Legal Aid Society cited a “long history of bullying and intimidation Abel has endured.”
Cedeño told detectives the two teens he stabbed were throwing pencils and papers at him before it turned violent.

Bump stocks already banned in Minnesota, maybe

MinnPost staff

Turns out it's complicated. MPR's Tim Nelson reports: “‘Bump stocks' — the devices found in the Las Vegas gunman's hotel room that enable semi-automatic rifles to fire much faster — have become the latest flashpoint in the national gun control debate. … Some members of Congress and are now calling for bans on bump stocks. The leader of the National Rifle Association wants more regulations on them. … But years ago, Minnesota lawmakers tried banning modifications allowing firearms to shoot faster — to no apparent effect.

Bundy Ranch Trial Delayed After Vegas Massacre

The mass shooting that left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded along the Las Vegas Strip could have implications for a high-profile federal trial that is set to begin in the city next week — a case that also involves weapons, the Washington Post reports. A federal judge delayed the trial of Ryan Payne, a Montana militiaman who is accused of weapons charges and conspiring against the U.S. government, by more than two weeks because of the Las Vegas shooting. The charges against Payne stem from the 2014 Bundy ranch standoff in Bunkerville, Nv. The trial was moved from Oct. 12 to Oct.

Burlington area affordable home construction falls below targets

Construction is one of the industries where workers are said to be frequently misclassified. Wikimedia photo
" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?fit=300%2C199&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?fit=610%2C405&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?resize=610%2C405&ssl=1" alt="worker" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?resize=610%2C405&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?resize=300%2C199&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?resize=768%2C510&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?resize=150%2C100&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/FEMA_-_44634_-_Roofer_working_on_a_home_in_Oklahoma.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Wikimedia photoSOUTH BURLINGTON — A coalition of Chittenden County housing groups said they exceeded their target for new homes in the first year of a five year campaign, but fell short of their goal for affordability. The Building Homes Together campaign was launched last year by the Champlain Housing Trust, Housing Vermont and the Chittenden County Regional Planning Coalition. They set a target for the county of having 3,500 new homes built over five years, with 20 percent of those homes selling or renting at prices affordable to low-income residents. At a news conference Wednesday, housing leaders said there were 916 new Chittenden County homes built in 2016, well above the 700 homes that was their target.

Burlington CEDO and Champlain College Host ‘Pathways to College and Career’ Fair on Nov. 3

News Release — Burlington CEDO
October 6, 2017
Contact:
Phet Keomanyvanh, CEDO Community Development Specialist-Public Engagement
802.865.7172
Burlington, VT – The Community and Economic Development Office (CEDO) is partnering with Champlain College to host a “Pathways to College and Career” Fair on Friday, Nov. 3 from 3 to 6 p.m. at Champlain College. This free event in the Champlain Room of the Center for Communication and Creative Media (CCM) is designed to support high school students' access to career resources and opportunities. The event will feature a resource fair and workshops on applications and financial aid with refreshments provided. “At a time when Vermont is looking to increase our high school graduates' continuation rates to 70 percent by 2025, the City of Burlington is proud to support initiatives to ensure all Burlington children have the opportunity to succeed,” said Mayor Miro Weinberger.

Burlington cleans up Church Street graffiti

“Off the Wall,” was painted on a mural off Church Street in Burlington to protest its exclusion of the Abenaki who lived in the Champlain Valley prior to Samuel de Champlain's arrival. Photo courtesy of Albert Petrarca
" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_5090-2.jpg?fit=300%2C116&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_5090-2.jpg?fit=610%2C235&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_5090-2.jpg?resize=610%2C235&ssl=1" alt="mural" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_5090-2.jpg?resize=610%2C235&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_5090-2.jpg?resize=125%2C48&ssl=1 125w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_5090-2.jpg?resize=300%2C116&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_5090-2.jpg?w=746&ssl=1 746w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">“Off the Wall,” was painted on a mural off Church Street in Burlington to protest its exclusion of the Abenaki who lived in the Champlain Valley prior to Samuel de Champlain's arrival. Photo courtesy of Albert PetrarcaA man spray painted the words “OFF THE WALL,” on a Church Street Marketplace mural on Monday in a Columbus Day protest. The city removed the graffiti Monday afternoon. Albert Petrarca defaced the mural to honor the holiday, which has been unofficially renamed “Indigenous Peoples Day.” Petrarca said the event was organized in response to frustration with the Euro-centric depiction of the region's history.

Burlington council asked to OK revised development deal

Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger, left, and businessman Don Sinex announce a $220 million plan Wednesday to redevelop downtown Burlington. Photo by Cory Dawson/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Burlington" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?resize=150%2C100&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Burlington-Mayor-Miro-Wienberger-and-Businessman-Don-Sinex-announce-a-220-plan-to-redevelop-downtown-Burlington.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger, left, and businessman Don Sinex announce a multimillion-dollar plan to redevelop downtown Burlington. File photo by Cory Dawson/VTDiggerMayor Miro Weinberger is urging city councilors to approve an agreement Monday that would allow construction to begin on a redevelopment of the Burlington Town Center mall and surrounding downtown area. The agreement lays out timelines, details payments and includes a commitment the developer will participate in the city's effort to heat downtown buildings with excess energy from the wood chip-fired McNeil Generating Station. The document would supercede a May 2016 agreement between developer Donald Sinex and the city of Burlington.

Burlington DPW nears completion of first sustainable infrastructure plan construction season

News Release — Office of Mayor Miro Weinberger
October 18, 2017
Contact:
Katie Vane, Mayoral Communications & Projects Coordinator, 802.734.0617
Rob Goulding, DPW Public Information Manager, 802.540.0846
Unveils ‘Projects Portal' to Help Public Track Construction Projects and Progress; Work Set to Begin on Upgrading Downtown Water Pipes
Burlington, VT – Today Mayor Miro Weinberger joined Department of Public Works (DPW) Director Chapin Spencer, Champlain Elementary School Principal Dr. Dorinne Dorfman, and Dealer.com Senior Manager of Operations Grace Ciffo near the new sidewalk outside Champlain Elementary School to recognize DPW's progress on its Sustainable Infrastructure Plan projects, and the launch of a new “projects portal” that will help keep residents informed on current and future projects. This work represents the beginning of implementation of the multi-year Sustainable Infrastructure Plan's reinvestment in the city, approved overwhelmingly by voters in November 2016. This season, DPW has been focused on road repaving, sidewalk reconstruction and upgrading the City's aging water infrastructure along multiple streets. By the end of the season, DPW will have completed 5 miles of road repaving (compared to a recent average of 3 miles/year), reconstructed over 3 miles of sidewalk (recent average, just over 1 mi/year) and proactively upgraded nearly 3 miles of water main (versus decades of only pursuing reactive replacement of broken pipes). “It has been exciting this construction season to see the will of the voters start to become a reality with the most substantial reinvestment in many years now improving the quality of our core municipal infrastructure for generations to come,” said Mayor Miro Weinberger “Thank you to the Public Works Department and Director Chapin Spencer for stepping up and largely meeting the ambitious first year goals of the new plan.”
Champlain Elementary School benefited from the first season of infrastructure work with the completion of a new sidewalk outside of the campus along Pine Street, and a new curb with an ADA-accessible ramp across the street.

Burlington Electric Department alerts customers to phone scam

News Release — Burlington Electric Department
October 6, 2017
Contact:
Mike Kanarick
802.735.7962
Encourages Customers to Sign Up for Attorney General's Office Scam Alert Notifications
Burlington, VT – The Burlington Electric Department today is warning customers about an ongoing bill payment phone scam targeting primarily Burlington restaurants and encouraging them to sign up for scam alert notifications from the Attorney General's Office. In a new wave of calls today, Burlington Electric customers have been receiving calls threatening disconnection if payment is not made immediately. These calls are not from Burlington Electric, and customers should hang up if they receive a call with such demands. If customers have any questions about their account status, they should call Burlington Electric at 802.865.7300 to let us know. Utilities follow very clear state rules when working with customers about paying past due bills and do not demand credit card information or alternate payment mechanisms from a customer for any purpose.

Burlington empties homeless camp after resolving property issue

Police want to shut down a a homeless encampment in Burlington. Photo by Mike Polhamus/VTDigger. " data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="homeless" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_9221-1.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Burlington cleared out this homeless encampment Thursday. File photo by Mike Polhamus/VTDiggerBURLINGTON — Police and city workers cleared a South End homeless encampment Thursday afternoon, despite initial concerns about whether they would be able to store property for its residents. Authorities had said for weeks that they would clear the camp, just off Sears Lane, because of safety concerns reported by nearby residents, including one instance where someone at the camp reportedly pulled a gun.

Burlington group discusses Memorial Auditorium future

Memorial Auditorium in Burlington. Wikipedia photo
" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?fit=300%2C221&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?fit=610%2C449&ssl=1" src="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?resize=610%2C449&ssl=1" alt="Memorial Auditorium" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?resize=610%2C449&ssl=1 610w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?resize=125%2C92&ssl=1 125w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?resize=300%2C221&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?resize=768%2C565&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/unnamed-4.jpg?w=908&ssl=1 908w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Memorial Auditorium in Burlington. Wikipedia photoBURLINGTON -The closing of a popular downtown event venue has prompted a Burlington neighborhood group to launch a discussion to help determine the fate of the space. More than 100 members of the Burlington community gathered Tuesday at City Hall to discuss the future of Memorial Auditorium at a meeting hosted by the Neighborhood Planning Assembly. The meeting was intended to serve as a “firewall” between highly polarized groups who have very strong beliefs on the now-closed venue's future, NPA chair Jim Holway said.

Burlington launches Mayor’s Prize to support entrepreneurship

News Release — City of Burlington
October 4, 2017
Contact:
Gillian Nanton, CEDO Assistant Director of Sustainability, Housing, and Economic Developmentgnanton@burlingtonvt.gov, 802-865-7179
Diana Colangelo, CEDO Projects and Policy Specialistdcolangelo@burlingtonvt.gov
In Partnership with Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, City Will Award More Than $300,000 over Two Years
Burlington, VT – Mayor Weinberger today announced the launch of The Mayor's Prize for Entrepreneurship, designed to increase support for the City's entrepreneurs. The Mayor's Prize will award more than $300,000 over a two-year period to not-for-profit entrepreneur support organizations (ESOs) or research organizations with a proven track record of success that propose innovative new or expanded programs to support the City's entrepreneurs. The goal of the Mayor's Prize is to foster the growth and development of entrepreneurship in the city and encourage outside-the-box thinking about how best to achieve this. The Mayor's Prize is entirely funded by a grant from the Kansas City-based Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. “Burlington has been influenced positively in many ways by the success of our entrepreneurs –Dealer.com, Seventh Generation, Burton Snowboards, Lake Champlain Chocolates, Switchback, and many more,” said Mayor Miro Weinberger.

Burlington man arraigned in fatal cleaver attack

Aita Gurung, 34, of Burlington appears in Vermont Superior Court of Friday, Oct. 13, 2017, pleading not guilty to first-degree murder and attempted murder. Police say Gurung hacked his wife Yogeswari Khadka, 32, to death with a cleaver and seriously injured her mother Thulsa Rimal, 54, in an attack at their home Thursday. Pool photo / Ryan Mercer, Burlington Free Press. " data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?fit=300%2C214&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?fit=610%2C436&ssl=1" src="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?resize=610%2C436&ssl=1" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?resize=610%2C436&ssl=1 610w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?resize=125%2C89&ssl=1 125w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?resize=300%2C214&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?resize=768%2C549&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/BUR20171013cleaver1.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Aita Gurung, 34, of Burlington appears in Vermont Superior Court of Friday, Oct.

Burlington police bust Brooklyn ‘drug crew,’ officers say

BURLINGTON — Police said they arrested two members of a “drug crew” out of Brooklyn, New York, and a Vermont man they said was helping the pair sell their product during a raid last Friday. Trevon Sutherland, 22, and Jermaine Rushing, 20, were arrested on drug charges after police executed a search warrant at a Lafountain Street home, where they encountered the two in the bathroom and 100 bags of heroin in the toilet, according to a news release. Trevon Sutherland, 22, was arrested during a drug raid in Burlington. Courtesy photo / Burlington Police Department
" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?fit=246%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?fit=610%2C743&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?resize=246%2C300&ssl=1" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?resize=246%2C300&ssl=1 246w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?resize=103%2C125&ssl=1 103w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?resize=768%2C936&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?resize=610%2C743&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sutherland.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w" sizes="(max-width: 246px) 100vw, 246px" data-recalc-dims="1">Trevon Sutherland, 22, was arrested during a drug raid in Burlington. Courtesy photo / Burlington Police DepartmentPolice said they also discovered $4,500 in cash and a loaded handgun.

Burlington Progressives say keep Burlington Telecom local

News Release — Burlington City Progressive Steering Committee
October 15, 2017
Contact:
Kelly Mangan, kellyannmangan@gmail.com, 802-324-6560
Don Schramm, dlschramm@gmail.com, 802-399-2493
KBTL offers the longest term value for Burlington citizens
Burlington, VT – The Burlington City Progressive Steering Committee has voted unanimously to support Keep BT Local's bid to purchase Burlington Telecom. Members cited numerous reasons for preferring KBTL over the other bidders. KBTL is the only bid that satisfies all of the criteria set by the Burlington Telecommunications Advisory Board, which extensively surveyed Burlingtonians through public testimony and written comments. The Board found that the #1 criterion of Burlington residents was to keep BT under local ownership and control. “Burlington is not for sale,” said City Councilor Ali Dieng (Ward 7-D/P).

Burlington schools chief vows better communication, two financial audits in first 100 days

Yaw Obeng, who was hired by the Burlington School District as the new superintendent after serving 20 years in educational leadership roles, began his job the week of August 31, he said. Photo by Jess Wisloski. BURLINGTON – New Burlington schools superintendent Yaw Obeng, who decamped from a Canadian district with 27 schools to oversee 11 here, has his sights set on improving educational equity and stabilizing the district's finances. “Building on a strong foundation, Burlington School District will serve as a model for the state, by increasing student achievement and narrowing the achievement gap through 21st-century classrooms,” he said at a news conference Thursday. Announcing his 100-day leadership plan, Obeng, 45, outlined his organizational strategy for the turbulent district while speaking in a classroom at the district's offices on Colchester Avenue.

Burlington to hold special Veterans Town Hall

News Release — Veterans Town Hall
Oct. 17, 2017
Contact:
Kristen EatonBTVvetstownhall@gmail.com
Burlington, Vermont — On Sunday, November 5th at 1pm, a special town hall event for veterans and members of the community will take place at Contois Auditorium in Burlington's City Hall. The event, inspired by author Sebastian Junger, is a community forum aiming to establish a greater understanding between local veterans and the friends and neighbors they fought for. In the tradition of warrior storytelling, veterans are invited to describe the pride, grief, rage, or quiet appreciation of life that the war bestowed upon them. Veterans are invited to share what their service means to them through a story, summary of service, message, letter home, excerpt from a war journal, or even the story behind a photograph.

Burlington’s Dr. Joseph Hagan honored with national AAP award

News Release — Vermont Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics
Sept. 28, 2017
Contact:
Justin Campfieldjustin@thinksparkmedia.com
Montpelier, Vt. (Sept. 28, 2017) – American Academy of Pediatrics Vermont Chapter member Dr. Joseph Hagan received the Clifford G. Grulee Award at the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in Chicago on Sept. 18, 2017.

Burwell settles excessive force lawsuit with Hartford officers

(This story by Jordan Cuddemi was first published in the Valley News on Sept. 27, 2017. BURLINGTON — A former Wilder resident who sued Hartford police in 2012 alleging officers used unreasonable force against him inside his own home settled on Wednesday with the two remaining defendants in his case. Wayne Burwell will receive $500,000, a sum that includes attorney's fees. The settlement included no acknowledgement of wrongdoing by the two officers, Frederick Peyton and Kristinnah Adams.
Wayne Burwell in 2007.

Bus Stops Get Fall Reprieve

The city's holding off until the end of the year with a plan to remove six State Street bus stop so neighbors have time to weigh in.

Business Leaders See Strong Trade Future, With or Without NAFTA

As NAFTA talks resumed, members of the local business community heard relative optimism about the future of commercial relations between Texas and Mexico. The post Business Leaders See Strong Trade Future, With or Without NAFTA appeared first on Rivard Report.

Business Report: Kodak helping you create new ‘Kodak Moments’

WXXI's Randy Gorbman talks with officials from Kodak Alaris about the new ‘Kodak Moments' app which uses a special algorithm to help people organize photos on computers and mobile devices according to which photos are the most meaningful to them. Also, former Xerox Chairman and CEO Ursula Burns is appointed to the Uber Board of Directors, and we also discuss a local connection to the opening of a new Oakley store at Eastview Mall. The WXXI Business report looks at business and economic issues facing the Rochester area including Western New York and the Finger Lakes.

Business Report: No more Toys“R”Us kids?

In this edition of the WXXI Business Report, Randy Gorbman talks with an RIT Marketing expert on what is behind the recent Toys"R"Us chapter 11 bankruptcy filing, and what the future may be for that chain. Also, there's news about the Daniele Family refurbishing a hotel in Brighton, and an iconic Rochester-grown auto service business is celebrating a milestone birthday. The WXXI Business report looks at business and economic issues facing the Rochester area including Western New York and the Finger Lakes.

Businesses Urged to Help Improve San Antonio’s Air Quality

Mayor Ron Nirenberg and other speakers at a summit on Friday said members of San Antonio's business community can help improve local air quality without hurting their bottom line. The post Businesses Urged to Help Improve San Antonio's Air Quality appeared first on Rivard Report.

Byrne Grants Did Not Improve Police Effectiveness: Study

Federal funding aimed at strengthening police departments' ability to fight the War on Drugs disproportionally affected African-American populations, but did not improve police effectiveness, according to a working paper released this month by The Center for Economic and Social Research (CESR) at the University of Southern California. The CESR paper focused on The Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program, a matching grant program authorized under the 1988 federal Anti-Drug Abuse Act. The Byrne Grant program, which was revised in 2005 to include a local law enforcement block grant program and renamed the Edward Byrne Justice Assistance Grants (JAG), was regarded as a key tool in implementing the federal government's efforts to curb narcotics trafficking. It was aimed primarily at reinforcing state and local law enforcement efforts to intervene against traffickers whose operations often span local boundaries. Byrne grants could be used to pay for additional police personnel, equipment, training, technical assistance and information systems, but about half the funding went to create multi-jurisdictional task forces.

CA Will be ‘Sanctuary State’ Under New Law

California Gov. Jerry Brown placed new limitations on state and local law enforcement's ability to help the federal government enforce immigration violations by signing California's controversial “sanctuary state” bill into law, the Sacramento Bee reports. Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León introduced the bill after the 2016 election to stifle President Trump's campaign pledge to ramp up deportations and to prevent the federal government from using California police officers to accomplish his goal. Brown signed nearly a dozen immigration-related bills Thursday. Others prohibit landlords from reporting their undocumented renters, bar employers from authorizing workplace raids by federal immigration enforcement officials, and allow students whose parents are deported to continue attending California schools. The “sanctuary state” measure, a hallmark of the state's so-called “resistance” to the White House, became a controversial topic and prompted U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement to campaign against it alongside the California State Sheriffs' Association.

Call Issued For A “Clean” DREAM Act

U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro and state colleges and universities system President Mark Ojakian are calling on the president to stand by his promise to use his heart in deciding the fate of “dreamers.”

Caltrans work causing delays on 156 this week and next

Caltrans will be doing road work and traffic will be affected Oct. 12, and Oct. 17 through 19 on Highway 156 between San Juan Bautista and Hollister.

Cam Kashier Raps A Self-Portrait

Voices swirl around a plaintive piano line at the beginning of “Heavy Hearted,” the first song on Blue Hunnits. Fingers run through chimes. Before the beat drops, Cam Kashier is already talking.Blue Hunnits by Cam Kashier“We were scraping change for lunch / Been through a lot of shit but that just made me tough / Product of my environment so my ways were stuck / When you really from the bottom, only way is up,” he raps.

Camera trap records nearly extinct cuckoo bird in Sumatra

Park rangers in Indonesia said this week that they had photographed the nearly extinct Sumatran ground cuckoo (Carpococcyx viridis) for the first time in a protected area in North Sumatra, the first time in 10 years that anyone has caught a glimpse of it. A camera trap in Batang Gadis National Park first captured the cuckoo last November at roughly 8.30 a.m., followed by another picture of the bird snapped about an hour later. Based on the recorded images, park officials and experts from Conservation International (CI), an NGO, identified the sighted bird as the Sumatran ground cuckoo, which is listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN. A camera trap captured the first appearance of the Sumatran ground cuckoo (Carpococcyx viridis) in a Sumatran national park. Photo courtesy of Batang Gadis National Park Agency & Conservation International.

Campaign Launched To Help Vulnerable Children & Families

The United Way of Greater New Haven sent in this write-up about the launch Tuesday to coincide with the launch of an annual campaign to help children and families in need, at a time when “funding cuts and general instability around the state budget process have sent shockwaves through the nonprofit community in Greater New Haven.” Click here to donate to the campaign.

Can a task force improve Mississippi’s approach to mental health?

Kayleigh Skinner, Mississippi TodayAttorney General Jim Hood speaks at a National Alliance on Mental Health Mississippi annual conference in May. After years of asking the Legislature to increase funds for the Department of Mental Health, Mississippi's attorney general is saying it's time to change the conversation on mental health in the state. On Tuesday, Attorney General Jim Hood convened the state's first task force on mental health. The meeting brought together 50 leaders in state law enforcement, healthcare and policy. Their goal he said was to generate new approaches to mental health in the state — and not, he insists, to ask for more money.

Can a web tool help coastal Texans assess their flood risk? A professor thinks so.

When Sam Brody and his wife were shopping for a new home in Houston six months ago, they had very different priorities. Brody, a researcher who analyzes ways to minimize the impact of natural disasters, was focused on the fact that not all of Houston's sprawling metropolitan area is created equal, especially when it comes to flood risks. “My wife was looking at the number of bedrooms, and I was looking at the proximity of bayous,” said Brody, a Texas A&M University at Galveston professor who specializes in coastal environmental planning. Sam and Korin Brody eventually settled on a place, but not before he had carefully scrutinized several flood-risk criteria, including the house's elevation, surrounding street drainage infrastructure and how close it was to federally identified floodplains — zones susceptible to rising waters during storms. He also checked to see if “newly renovated” homes that caught his wife's eye were actually renovated because they had flooded in the past. “It's my business to know that, but other people don't have have that data,” said Brody.

Can Autonomous Vehicle Tech Outperform Human Judgement?

The introduction of autonomous vehicles presents an ethical dilemma as drivers make countless decisions on the road, many of them instantaneous judgements. The post Can Autonomous Vehicle Tech Outperform Human Judgement? appeared first on Rivard Report.

Can community forestry deliver for Madagascar’s forests and people?

ANOSY REGION, Madagascar — The land in the Mandrare River Basin, in southeastern Madagascar, does not seem like the kind of place that could support an economy based on wood. The trees are low, scrubby, covered with thorns. Succulents stretch fleshy spires into a cloudless sky. Vast sisal plantations cover the dusty plains landscape in a grid. But the shoulder of the road that leads west is soon dotted with a display of the spiny forest's prodigious output: there are thick, carved wooden blocks made to prevent runaway trucks, makeshift stands piled head-high with charcoal in 100-pound sacks, and rough wooden planks hewn from the trunks of spindly Madagascar ocotillo (Alluaudia procera), used locally to build houses.

Can Congress Block Trump From Firing Mueller?

Congress may be unable to provide job protection for special counsel Robert Mueller, whose wide-ranging investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election continues to anger President Trump, McClatchy Newspapers reports. Experts offered the Senate Judiciary Committee competing views on whether two bills designed to protect Mueller from firing by Trump or someone in the Justice Department would pass constitutional muster. A bill sponsored by North Carolina Republican Thom Tillis and Delaware Democrat Chris Coons would allow a fired special counsel to have his dismissal reviewed by a three-judge panel within 14 days. Another measure from Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Cory Booker (D-NJ) would require the Justice Department to clear such a firing with a panel of judges before it could take effect. “The bills … are unwise and unconstitutional,” said Akhil Reed Amar, a constitutional law professor at Yale Law School, who publicly opposed Trump in the election.

Can CT lawmakers move past rhetoric to a new budget?

Whether legislators and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy can prevent a Hartford bankruptcy, further bond rating downgrades, emergency municipal tax increases, and the loss of huge federal dollars could hinge on their ability to set aside political rhetoric.

Can In-Depth Journalism Make Taiwan’s Next Generation Believe?

With trust and interest in journalism declining among millennials around the globe, Taiwan's Reporter is taking a gamble. Their mission: re-engage the younger generation with in-depth journalism. Launched in September 2015, The Reporter stood out among other non-profit media organizations in Taiwan as the first of its kind to be funded by a public foundation. With a US$170,000 (NTD 5 million) personal donation from the co-founder of Taiwan tech company Asus, philanthropist TH Tung, The Reporter Cultural Foundation now depends on other donations to help maintain newsroom operations. Triple Play: The Reporter's series on Taiwan's fishing industry (with Indonesia's Tempo) won three SOPA awards.

Can the U.S. Halt the ‘Unprecedented’ Opioid Epidemic?

Only a concerted nationwide effort involving police, healthcare providers, community leaders and courts can tackle an opioid epidemic that is “unprecedented” in size and scope, according to a report by the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF). Summarizing the recommendations of a conference held in New York City this spring, attended by dozens of police chiefs, sheriffs and federal officials, the report included calls for stepping up data-sharing on opioid users and dealers among law enforcement agencies, and a greater focus on strategies for preventing opioid overdose deaths. “There is no more important issue in many cities and towns today than the opioids epidemic,” wrote PERF executive director Chuck Wexler in his introduction to the report—the organization's third major study of the issue—which was released this week. “Unfortunately, this epidemic is not yet showing signs of abating. So we must continue to expand the programs that we know are working, while reassessing our strategies and searching for new approaches.”
Table displayed at conference showing the rise of drug overdose deaths in New York City, 2010-2016.

Candidates Diverge On Judge’s Role

Depending who wins a contested citywide election, a recovering crack addict will face either a “judge” or a “judge/social worker” in her quest to regain custody of her children.

Candidates for CO governor are bankrolling their own races. Chances are, it won’t pay off.

Colorado's 2018 governor's race is shaping up to be a free-for-all. But this contest isn't really “free” for some of the candidates. Several are putting plenty of their own cash into the race, with eight months to go until the primary election. Republican businessman Victor Mitchell has loaned his campaign more than $3 million already. Millionaire U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, a Boulder Democrat, has put $630,000 into his campaign through Sept.

Candidates question value of Mayor Berry’s ‘groundbreaking’ ABQ crime report

The “groundbreaking research” Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry commissioned on crime — the city's No. 1 issue — may sit on a shelf unused when his successor takes office Dec. 1. Why? The two candidates headed for a mayoral runoff election next month, two-term Republican city councilor Dan Lewis and Democratic state Auditor Tim Keller, said […]

Candidates Rich and Poor Competing

Candidates Rich and Poor Competing
Occupational income, investments, debts, real estate,business interests, and much more detailed in filings
Investigative Report by Ken Martin© The Austin Bulldog 2014Posted Tuesday, September 30, 2014 2:54pm
Mayoral candidate Stephen Ira “Steve” Adler is clearly the wealthiest candidate running for city office, while his two chief opponents, incumbent Council Members Sheryl Nelson Cole and Michael William “Mike” Martinez, are merely well off, comparatively speaking, based on a review of their sworn financial statements. These financial statements are separate and apart from the contribution and expenditure reports required in connection with election campaigns. Personal resources provide a significant advantage if candidates choose to invest in their campaigns. But that advantage is diminished if not accompanied by the work it takes to build a broad base of support. Campaigns are not won with checkbooks alone, but according to Campaign Finance Reports filed July 15, which reflected fundraising and expenditures through June 30, 21 candidates had already loaned their campaigns a combined half-million dollars—$504,911 to be exact.

Candy Donations for Parrott

Drop off at Haldane, Foodtown, ButterfieldCandy Donations for Parrott was first posted on October 21, 2017 at 7:51 am.

Car bomb kills crusading journalist in Malta who investigated Panama Papers

News sources today are reporting the tragic death of Daphne Caruana Galizia, a journalist who reported on the Panama Papers investigation and was renowned for her own investigations into corruption in Malta. Caruana Galizia, 53, was reportedly killed in a car bombing near her home. Local media reports indicated that in recent days she had filed a police report complaining of death threats. Caruana Galizia was a fearless journalist and blogger who exposed numerous offshore dealings of prominent figures in Malta. She was also the mother of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) developer and data journalist Matthew Caruana Galizia.

Car bomb kills crusading Panama Papers journalist in Malta

News sources today are reporting the tragic death of Daphne Caruana Galizia, a journalist who led the Panama Papers investigation into corruption in Malta. Caruana Galizia, 53, was reportedly killed in a car bombing near her home. Local media reports indicated that in recent days she had filed a police report complaining of death threats. Caruana Galizia was a fearless journalist and blogger who exposed numerous offshore dealings of prominent figures in Malta. She was also the mother of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) developer and data journalist Matthew Caruana Galizia.

Car tax repeal hits a snag, tentative CT budget still unbalanced

Senate Democratic leaders hinted Monday that plans to eliminate property taxes on motor vehicles next year as part of a new state budget would be scaled back or scrapped altogether — just two business days after legislative leaders announced the initiative.

Carbon emissions cloud utility’s growing electric water heater program

A major Minnesota utility's electric water heater program is doing little to reduce carbon emissions — but that could change with a more robust mix of renewable energy sources and green pricing initiatives, according to a new analysis. Research by Fresh Energy, a Minnesota-based nonprofit that is also the publisher of Midwest Energy News, found that the electric storage water heater program operated by Great River Energy (GRE) emits substantially more carbon than heaters using natural gas or propane, because the utility still depends on coal for two-thirds of its generation. A generation and transmission cooperative serving more than 685,000 members, GRE is Minnesota's largest supplier of electricity to cooperative and municipal utilities. For three decades the company has offered the water heater program, which allows members of its 28 client co-ops to reduce their utility bills by using electricity to heat water rather than natural gas or propane. Customers agree to allow their water heaters to be charged at night and turned off during the day.

Carbon-Free Driving

Talk on future of electric carsCarbon-Free Driving was first posted on October 14, 2017 at 7:11 am.

Care Aimed Specifically At Alzheimer’s Patients At This Iowa Care Center

Not all care centers have prohibitions against dementia patients. Some, in fact, are designed specifically for people diagnosed with Alzheimer's. One example is Arbor Springs, in West Des Moines, where residents live in six small “neighborhoods,” each with its own living room, dining room and outdoor courtyard. Just nine residents live in each neighborhood. Lyle Muller/IowaWatchKatie Parker, program director at Arbor Springs a West Des Moines, Iowa, community for people with dementia and Alzheimer's disease, leads Enid Blevins, 96, in a memory game during activity time on Aug.

Caring for a steady influx of homeless, uprooted students

The Mirror sat down for a Sunday conversation with Shelimar Ramirez, homeless coordinator for Hartford schools and the person responsible for getting homeless and displaced children enrolled in school – sometimes 350 students a year.

Carl Hiaasen: Support FCIR During News Match 2017

Dear Fellow Floridians,
After 40 years of writing for the Miami Herald, I can confidently describe Florida as a place where you could turn loose a hundred investigative reporters — and they'd never run out of material. Carl Hiaasen
A native Floridian, Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for the Miami Herald and the author of more than two dozen books, including Lucky You, Sick Puppy and, most recently, Razor Girl. Unfortunately, we live in an era of shrinking newspapers and growing government corruption. From the Panhandle to the Keys, lobbyists and favored interests have rarely held more sway over politicians, and faced less scrutiny of their actions. Meanwhile our Legislature and governor continue their quest to restrict access to important official records that for decades have been readily available — not just to the media, but to everybody.

Carroll appointed to Green Valley justice court

Former longtime county supervisor Ray Carroll was appointed Tuesday to a justice of the peace position at Green Valley Justice Court, filling a vacant spot on the bench. The Pima County Board of Supervisors, with a few predictable moments of drama, voted 4-1 to appoint him.

Cary Kennedy, a Colorado gubernatorial candidate, wants to give teachers a raise. Here’s how.

Former state treasurer Cary Kennedy wants to give Colorado teachers a sizeable bump in pay. One of several prominent Democrats running for governor, Kennedy, who helped write a constitutional amendment to increase school funding, released her education plan Thursday. The main goal is to get every Colorado kid into college or the work force by the age of 19. To do that, she's putting her political capital into making the state's teachers happier. The proposal calls for more pay, a scholarship program to attract more teachers of color, and giving teachers a larger say in the state's testing and accountability systems. She's also calling for school districts to adopt a school improvement policy favored by teachers unions that calls for more welfare programs in the schools to combat the effects of poverty.

Casella Waste Systems appoints James E. O’Connor as lead independent director

News Release — Casella Waste Systems
Oct. 19, 2015
Contacts:
Casella Waste Systems, Inc.
Investors:
Ned Coletta, 802-772-2239
Chief Financial Officer
or
Media:
Joseph Fusco, 802-772-2247
Vice President
or
Sard Verbinnen & Co. Mark Harnett/Zachary Tramonti, 212-687-8080
RUTLAND, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Casella Waste Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq: CWST) (“Casella” or the “Company”), a regional solid waste, recycling, and resource management services company, today announced that James E. O'Connor, a waste management industry veteran who joined the Casella Board in July 2015, has been appointed to serve as lead independent director of Casella's Board of Directors (the “Board”) effective immediately. Mr. O'Connor succeeds Gregory B. Peters, who continues to serve as a member of the Casella Board. “Jim is extremely well-suited to serve as the Board's lead independent director and I and the rest of the Casella Board look forward to working with Jim in his new role,” said John W. Casella, Chairman and CEO of Casella.

Cash for conservation: Do payments for ecosystem services work?

As far as conservation strategies go, payments for ecosystem services (PES) are based on a relatively simple concept — perhaps deceptively simple. The idea behind PES is, essentially, to pay landowners to protect their land in the interest of ensuring the provision of some “service” rendered by nature, such as clean water, habitat for wildlife, or carbon storage in forests. One of the most attractive aspects of PES programs is that they don't just channel investments into environmental conservation. People also reap the rewards of those investments, literally and figuratively. That means that PES, in theory, can help alleviate poverty and reduce the conflicts that can arise between conservationists and local communities at the same time that it ties conservation funds directly to activities that benefit the planet.

Castleton University president named

Karen Scolforo, the president of Castleton University. Courtesy photo
" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?fit=300%2C206&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?fit=610%2C419&ssl=1" src="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?resize=610%2C419&ssl=1" alt="Karen Scolforo" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?resize=610%2C419&ssl=1 610w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?resize=125%2C86&ssl=1 125w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?resize=300%2C206&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?resize=768%2C527&ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Karen-Scolforo.jpg?w=1200&ssl=1 1200w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Karen Scolforo, the president of Castleton University. Courtesy photoThe Board of Trustees of the Vermont State College System unanimously appointed Karen Scolforo to be President of Castleton University, Thursday afternoon at their annual retreat. In December, Scolforo will take over for retiring President Dave Wolk. VSCS Chancellor Jeb Spaulding backed the Board's decision.

Cate’s Favor to SoccerCity Wasn’t Necessary — It Was Illegal

On June 15, the city attorney gave privileged and confidential advice about the SoccerCity ballot measure to the City Council and mayor. City Councilman Chris Cate then secretly sent that memo, which was stamped “Confidential” and “Privileged” in big letters at the top, to one of his max campaign donors, Craig Benedetto, who was working for SoccerCity. On June 25, SoccerCity's lawyer revealed he had that confidential memo when he used it to attack a competing proposal. That mistake by SoccerCity's lawyer is the only way we found out about any of this. For 100 days, Cate refused to admit he was the one who had done it.

Catoberfest is Coming

Fundraiser for animal shelterCatoberfest is Coming was first posted on October 13, 2017 at 2:41 pm.

CCA Bringing Harry Belafonte To Shubert

Sing Your Song." alt="">To celebrate its 50th anniversary, the New Haven-based nonprofit Christian Community Action is bringing legendary musician and social activist Harry Belafonte to the stage of the Shubert Theatre on Temple Street.

CDC: 4 in 10 diagnosed cancers in U.S. are associated with excess weight

Susan Perry

Excess body fat is associated with an increased risk of 13 types of cancer, and those cancers account for four out of 10 cancers diagnosed in the United States each year, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).In 2014, about 630,000 Americans were diagnosed with one of these weight-related cancers, the report says.The CDC researchers also note that although the overall rate of new cancer diagnoses has fallen since the 1990s, diagnoses of cancers associated with being overweight or obese have risen. “The findings emphasize the importance of intensifying nationwide efforts to prevent and treat overweight and obesity,” the researchers write. Many Americans unaware of connectionAs just about everybody knows by now, the United States — and much of the world — is in the midst of an epidemic of excess weight. About one third of U.S. adults are overweight (defined as a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 to 29.9), and another third are obese (a BMI of 30 or greater).Yet, surveys have shown that only about half of Americans are aware that excess weight has been linked to an increased risk of cancer.The new report, which was published Tuesday, is based on data from the United States Cancer Statistics for 2014. The CDC researchers used that data to assess incidence trends from 2005 to 2014 for the 13 cancers for which excess weight is a known risk factor.Those cancers are meningioma (cancer in the tissue covering the brain and spinal cord), multiple myeloma (a type of blood cancer), adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, postmenopausal breast cancer, and cancers of the colon and rectum, endometrium, gallbladder, upper stomach (gastric cardia), kidney, liver, ovary, pancreas and thyroid.To be clear, however, although these 13 cancers are more likely to occur in people who are overweight or obese, that doesn't mean having excess weight causes them. Scientists still do not know what is behind the association.Centers for Disease Control and PreventionMajor findingsHere are some of the key findings from the Vital Signs report:Weight-related cancers made up 40 percent of the nearly 1.6 million cancers diagnosed in the U.S. in 2014 — 55 percent of the cancers diagnosed in women and 24 percent of the cancers diagnosed in men.

CDC: Risk of suicide is greater in rural areas than in large cities

Susan Perry

People living in rural areas of the United States are at greater risk of suicide than those living in urban areas, according to a new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).Specifically, the study found that the suicide rate in rural counties is almost a third higher than the rate in large metropolitan areas.This finding supports another CDC study published earlier this year that reported a widening gap in suicide rates between rural and urban areas over the past two decades. The new study, however, takes a more in-depth look at this trend by analyzing it by gender, race, ethnicity, age and method of suicide.Suicide research has taken on an even greater sense of urgency in recent years. The national suicide rate has climbed by more than 20 percent during the past two decades. Suicide is now the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 44,000 Americans take their lives each year.

Center for Public Integrity invests in future with new hires

The Center for Public Integrity has taken advantage of fresh investment and unprecedented interest in Washington, D.C.-based investigative reporting to hire a spate of new journalists, beefing up coverage in existing departments and adding positions in new areas. The jobs address needs in data reporting, audience engagement, national security and the environment, among other areas. The Center has also created a new beat covering immigration. The positions have been made possible in part through support from the Democracy Fund, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the MacArthur Foundation, the Grantham Foundation, the Knight Foundation, the California Endowment, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Wellspring Philanthropic Fund, as well as from numerous individual contributors. “We've brought on board some tremendously talented individuals as well as invested in and repositioned some folks who have been with us for years,” said John Dunbar, the Center's CEO.

Center for Public Integrity wins investigative reporting award

An in-depth Center for Public Integrity investigation unveiling close ties between state insurance commissioners and the industry they regulate has been honored with a prestigious Online Journalism Award. The project, Drinks, dinners, junkets and jobs: how the insurance industry courts state commissioners, received the Al Neuharth Innovation in Investigative Journalism Award in the small newsroom category on Saturday at the Online News Association's conference in Washington, D.C.

"This was a vitally important investigation that shined a revealing light on the little-understood conflicts-of-interest that continue to plague state government," said Gordon Witkin, the Center's executive editor. Using interviews, lobbyist reports, regulator financial disclosures, court documents, campaign finance records and more than 3,700 pages of emails obtained through open records laws in 13 states, the initial piece documented the cozy relationships between the nation's insurance companies and their regulators. It documented the extent of a revolving door in which jobs are sought over lunches and dinners while commissioners are still in office. It mapped the financial ties regulators have to the insurers they oversee, even as their government offices are underfunded and understaffed.

Central Coast Air Quality Officials Issue WildFire Smoke Advisory

San Benito County residents to stay indoors if they have breathing disorders.

Central Health Financial Policies Hotly Debated

Central Health Financial Policies Hotly Debated
$185 million dollars given to Dell Medical Schooland Seton, with little to show for indigent healthcare
by Ken Martin© The Austin Bulldog 2017Part 2 in a SeriesPosted Friday September 22, 2017 ….am
The challenge for Central Health is how to improve accountability for mega-millions of dollars it doles out to other agencies. The chief beneficiaries of this funding are the University of Texas Dell Medical School and the Seton Healthcare Family. Together they will have received $240 million through the FY 2018 from taxes levied by Central Health. State law dictates those funds may only be used to provide indigent healthcare services. Yet Central Health, the agency created by voters in 2004 to provide healthcare services for the uninsured poor people of Travis County, has little proof of how much of that $240 million was actually used to provide indigent healthcare—services that by law is Central Health's sole responsibility.

Central Hudson Asks to Raise Rates

Hearing in Newburgh on Oct. 16Central Hudson Asks to Raise Rates was first posted on October 14, 2017 at 7:03 am.

Century-old national park saguaro blasted with shotgun

A 100-150-year-old towering cactus in Saguaro National Park was recently shot up multiple times, and authorities are asking the public for help finding the vandal. The protected plant is not expected to survive.

CEOs scolded Trump after Charlottesville. Will corporations close their checkbooks?

When President Donald Trump said counter protestors at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, should share the blame for violence there, the backlash was fast and furious. Among Trump's most outspoken critics: corporate CEOs, who resigned from White House advisory councils and issued vehement statements breaking with the president. But when the Center for Public Integrity this month asked nearly four dozen large public companies whether they would continue making contributions to funds or political committees related to the Trump administration, none would commit to withholding money from Trump going forward. That list included several companies with CEOs who stepped down from Trump advisory bodies to protest the president's comments after the Charlottesville violence, or who have publicly pilloried Trump's other policies, such as those on immigration or climate change. Many companies, including Coca-Cola and Qualcomm, didn't respond to questions.

Chad Butt & Benji Thurber: Mentoring as a pathway out of poverty

Editor's note: This commentary is by Chad Butt and Benji Thurber, executive director and communications director respectively, who work for Mobius, a nonprofit that supports youth mentoring programs throughout the state of Vermont. They are both residents of Burlington. As Paul Heintz highlighted in his recent Seven Days article “State of Need,” Vermont's efforts to address poverty over the past decade have been largely unsuccessful. Not only has the state not reached its lofty 10-year goal of cutting the child poverty rate in half, the percentage of young people living in poverty has actually increased from 12.4 percent in 2007 to 14.8 percent in 2016. In terms of the overall poverty rate, in 2016, Vermont was the only state in the country to experience a statistically significant increase, rising from 10.2 percent in 2015 to 11.9 percent in 2016.

Chalk It Up Fills Downtown Streets with Color

The 14th annual Artpace Chalk It Up brought San Antonians in their thousands downtown. The post Chalk It Up Fills Downtown Streets with Color appeared first on Rivard Report.

Chalk It Up Makes Art ‘Accessible to All’

If cultural equity is in the air, it finds expression in the chalk dust that will color San Antonio's downtown streets. The post Chalk It Up Makes Art ‘Accessible to All' appeared first on Rivard Report.

Challenge Slate Defeats Four-Term Union Prez

A challenge slate of public employees calling for more democratic, transparent union leadership came into power on Friday night after a municipal union election saw an end to the current president's eight-year tenure as city labor leader.

Challenge Slate Takes On City Union Prez

An election Friday will put to the test a municipal union president's eight-year tenure — and hard-charging approach to negotiating with the city.

Chamber of Secrets: Teaching a Machine What Congress Cares About

by Jeremy B. Merrill
If you asked congressional experts what legislative subjects, say, Sen. Patty Murray of Washington specializes in, they'd have a few pretty good guesses: maybe education and health care — because she's the ranking member on a key committee that oversees those issues. If you asked who else in the Senate shares her interests, you might hear Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado. Why? Because he is a former school superintendent and a member on that same committee. You could ask them the same question about more members of Congress, but before you got through all 535 lawmakers, they'd probably hang up on you.

Changing the Southside Narrative with Unrelenting Momentum

We are in the midst of a new era in District 3, and we continue to celebrate that it is the past, present, and future of this great city. The post Changing the Southside Narrative with Unrelenting Momentum appeared first on Rivard Report.

Chapel West 2.0

Chapel West has done a remarkable job. Basically replacing the city as much as possible and providing services to us property owners. May I suggest the next step?

Checking Our Biases in a City of Shared Languages and Cultures

We believe it's important to give readers a range of content that reflects the diversity and, at times, the deep divisions among the many communities that make up our city. The post Checking Our Biases in a City of Shared Languages and Cultures appeared first on Rivard Report.

Chicago Murders Are Down, So Why Doesn’t It Feel That Way?

This story originally ran on Medill Reports:
Murder in Chicago is down—following an sharp 17.5 percent decrease from 2012 to 2013. And with two-and-a-half months to go before the close of 2014, the city is on target for an additional 3 percent drop in its murder count. The trend Chicago is experiencing is national, as violent crime is down across the country. Yet many Chicago residents are painfully aware that the city's struggle with violent crime continues. And youth advocates say the crisis does not feel any different, or any less prevalent than it did in 2012.

Chicago’s Bankruptcy Boom

by Paul Kiel and Hannah Fresques
This week we published a deep look at why bankruptcy frequently fails to provide relief to black Americans struggling with debt. The story focused on Memphis, Tennessee — the bankruptcy capital of the nation — where black debtors have for generations been funneled into Chapter 13, which usually requires five years of payments most have no chance of making. Debt-laden consumers outside the South overwhelmingly file under Chapter 7, which wipes away most debts, our story and analysis shows. But in recent years, there's been one big geographic exception: Chicago. In Northern Illinois, Chapter 13 Filing Rates Have Been Rising Steeply in Black Areas
Chapter 13 filings per 1,000 residents - black census tracts vs.

Chicken workers sue, say they were modern-day slaves

Three Oklahoma men filed a federal class action lawsuit today alleging that they were modern-day slaves forced by a drug rehabilitation program to work for free in chicken plants. An investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting last week found that judges across the country have ordered defendants into rehab programs that double as work camps for for-profit companies. The investigation zeroed in on Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery, an Oklahoma program that puts hundreds of men a year to work slaughtering chickens at processing plants owned by Simmons Foods. The men work for free, under constant threat of prison, on big name brands, including Popeyes, KFC and Rachael Ray Nutrish pet food. The rehab program keeps their wages.

Chickie Galligan (1936-2017)

Haldane grad and former Miss BeaconChickie Galligan (1936-2017) was first posted on September 25, 2017 at 11:32 pm.

Children are more likely to play with real guns after watching a violent movie, study finds

Susan Perry

Children are more likely to play with a real gun after watching a PG-rated movie with violence and guns than after watching the same movie with the violence cut out of it, according to a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.This finding is troubling, given how easily accessible guns and media violence are to many children in the United States. Hear are some of the sobering statistics:Almost 60 percent of U.S. households with guns do not keep them locked up — even though most unintentional shootings of children happen at home, usually as a result of a child finding and playing with an unlocked gun.Children in the U.S. are 10 times more likely to die as the result of an unintentional shooting than children from other developed countries.Gun violence in movies has increased dramatically in recent years, particularly in PG-rated ones. Such violence more than doubled between 1985 and 2005, and a study published earlier this year found that the amount of violence in movies aimed at children has continued through 2015. Previous studies have shown that the more adolescents are exposed to movie characters who smoke and drink alcohol, the greater the likelihood they will engage in those behaviors. The authors of the current study — Brad Bushman of Ohio State University and Kelly Dillon of Wittenberg University — wanted to find out if something similar happens when younger children see movie characters using guns.

Children’s Literacy Foundation’s At-Risk Children grant applications available now through Dec. 6

News Release — Children's Literacy Foundation
September 27, 2017
CLiF Contact:
Erika Nichols-Frazer, Communications Manager
(802) 244-0944communications@clifonline.org
Waterbury Center, VT —The Children's Literacy Foundation (CLiF)'s At-Risk Children grant application for Spring 2018 is available now at www.clifonline.org under “Literacy Programs.” The deadline to submit this application is December 6, 2017. Organizations serving low-income, at-risk, or rural kids up to age twelve in New Hampshire and/or Vermont and which can gather at least 30 children for a storytelling event and book giveaway are eligible to apply. The grant provides an on-site children's book library for the organization or program, as well as two new books for each child in attendance to select and keep, and an inspiring storytelling presentation for children and families with one of CLiF's 62 popular children's author/illustrators, poets, graphic novelists, and storytellers. CLiF also offers an optional training session for the parents and families served by the grantee about the importance of reading to and with young children, and strategies for doing so effectively. CLiF Program Manager Jana Brown says, “CLiF's At-Risk Children grant is an exciting opportunity to inspire children at risk of growing up with low literacy skills to love reading and writing.

Chimp attack survivor helps others overcome severe physical trauma

In June 2012, Andrew Oberle, an aspiring primate researcher, was brutally attacked by two chimpanzees at a zoo in South Africa. The animals tore his flesh from head to toe and he nearly died. But after 26 surgeries and extensive therapies at Saint Louis University Hospital, Oberle recovered. His ability to overcome his traumatic experiences led him to want to help others in who've experienced extreme physical injuries. Today, Oberle serves as the director of development for the Oberle Institute, a trauma care program at Saint Louis University that is supported by foudations.

China sends first pandas to Indonesia under captive-breeding agreement

JAKARTA — A panda couple arrived here on Thursday, kicking off a captive breeding program aimed at boosting the species' population, which is already inching upward thanks to the efforts of conservationists. The male and female bears, named Cai Tao and Hu Chun, were flown in from the southwestern Chinese city of Chengdu. They arrived at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport at 9 a.m. local time. The seven-year-old giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are the first to come to Indonesia since both nations signed a lease agreement last year. Hu Chun, the female panda, arrives in Indonesia.

Chittenden County Sen. Debbie Ingram arrested for DUI

Sens. Chris Pearson, P/D-Chittenden, left, and Debbie Ingram, D-Chittenden, on the first day of the legislative session. Photo by Anne Galloway/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Chris Pearson, Debbie Ingram" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?resize=150%2C100&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_4088.jpg?w=1024&ssl=1 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Sen. Debbie Ingram, D-Chittenden, on the first day of the legislative session. File photo by Anne Galloway/VTDiggerWILLISTON — State Sen. Debbie Ingram, D-Chittenden, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol Thursday night. Police responded to a crash on South Road around 8 p.m. They said Ingram, 55, drove off the road and struck a “fixed object” before continuing on and veering off the road again, according to a Seven Days report.

Chloe Learey: Beating ‘adverse childhood experiences’

Editor's note: This commentary is by Chloe Learey, the executive director of Winston Prouty Center for Child and Family Development in Brattleboro. She serves on the Building Bright Futures State Advisory Council, a governor-appointed body which advises the Administration and Legislature on early childhood care, health and education systems.
Years of research have demonstrated that adverse childhood experiences have an impact on child development and ultimately adult health outcomes. Much of this information can be found at ACESTooHigh, a news site that reports on research about adverse childhood experiences, including developments in epidemiology, neurobiology, and the biomedical and epigenetic consequences of toxic stress. Prolonged exposure to trauma creates an environment of toxic stress that can change the architecture of the brain due to the physiological response stress produces. Fortunately, the human brain is elastic, particularly in the early years, and there are things we can do in our work with young children and their families to decrease exposure to adverse childhood experiences or decrease the negative impact they may have.

Church Street murder suspect seeks to represent himself

Public Defender Leroy Yoder and Chittenden County State's Attorney Sarah George appear in court. Photo by Morgan True / VTDigger. " data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?fit=300%2C229&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?fit=610%2C465&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?resize=610%2C465&ssl=1" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?resize=610%2C465&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?resize=125%2C95&ssl=1 125w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?resize=300%2C229&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?resize=768%2C585&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?resize=150%2C114&ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?w=2000&ssl=1 2000w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/P1190751.jpg?w=3000&ssl=1 3000w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Public defender Leroy Yoder and Chittenden County State's Attorney Sarah George appear in court Thursday for the arraignment of Louis Fortier. File photo by Morgan True/VTDigger.BURLINGTON — The man charged with first degree murder in a fatal stabbing on Church Street told a judge Thursday that he wants to represent himself in the case. Louis Fortier, 36, was identified by witnesses and surveillance video as the person who repeatedly stabbed Richard Medina, 43, at the Church Street Marketplace on Wednesday afternoon.

Ciclopalooza: San Antonio’s First DIY Bike Festival

Members of the public are encouraged to create and add their own events in this community-led celebration of cycling that runs from Oct. 12-22. The post Ciclopalooza: San Antonio's First DIY Bike Festival appeared first on Rivard Report.

Circuit Attorney Gardner seeks money, staff to do conduct investigation of officer-involved killings

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner contends the current system of investigating a police officer who kills someone is “broken,” prompting her to ask for more than $1 million for her department to handle the cases from start to finish. Gardner brought her proposal to the public safety committee of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen on Tuesday. Some committee members expressed support for the idea.

Cities Dial Amazon Direct

After Connecticut spurned them, New Haven and Bridgeport took a quest to land a $5 billion new corporate campus directly to the company doing some high-stakes shopping: Amazon.

Citing funding reduction, COTS to lay off case managers

Rita Markley is the executive director of the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS) in Burlington. Rita Markley is the executive director of the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS) in Burlington. Courtesy photo
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?fit=300%2C192&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?fit=610%2C391&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=610%2C391&ssl=1" alt="Rita Markley" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=610%2C391&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=125%2C80&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=300%2C192&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=768%2C492&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=150%2C96&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=140%2C90&ssl=1 140w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?resize=220%2C140&ssl=1 220w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RitaMarkley.jpg?w=1124&ssl=1 1124w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Rita Markley is the executive director of the Committee on Temporary Shelter, in Burlington. Courtesy photoA nonprofit organization dedicated to ending homelessness is laying off case managers who provide long-term help to families seeking to get back on their feet. The Committee on Temporary Shelter, or COTS, in Burlington will lay off all five of its case managers — representing the equivalent of 4½ full-time positions — later this month.

Citing risks, mayor looks to nix co-op bid for Burlington Telecom

Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger speaks at the announcement Wednesday that Burlington Telecom is expanding the Lifeline program. Photo by Alexandre Silberman/VTDigger
The press conference was outside of city hall in Burlington. " data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Miro Weinberger" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IMG_6680.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger. File photo by Alexandre Silberman/VTDiggerBURLINGTON — Mayor Miro Weinberger said Tuesday that he does not believe a local co-op's bid to purchase Burlington Telecom is viable, and he's urging the City Council to drop it from the finalists. The council on Monday is expected to winnow the three remaining bids for the fiber internet, cable and phone company down to two.

City Announces 2017 Distinction in the Arts Honorees

The annual program honors individuals who have worked to advance and maintain San Antonio's cultural vibrancy. The post City Announces 2017 Distinction in the Arts Honorees appeared first on Rivard Report.

City Attorney Challenges SDPD on Rape Kit Testing

Two of San Diego's top law enforcement officials remain at odds over how police should handle DNA evidence collected from victims of sexual assault.
During her 2016 run for city attorney, and now almost a year into her tenure, Mara Elliott has repeatedly called for the San Diego Police Department to send all sexual assault kits to the crime lab for analysis. She's had multiple discussions with Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman, she said, to no avail. Zimmerman maintains that the department's approach — to first determine whether the kit will provide useful evidence before sending it off the lab — is smarter and more efficient. “You might say we have a professional disagreement,” Elliott said. Elliott recently sent letters to Gov. Jerry Brown, urging him to sign legislation encouraging law enforcement agencies to analyze all sexual assault kits.

City attorney questions local bid for Burlington Telecom

Keep BT Local demonstrator. Photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Keep BT Local demonstrator" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Keep BT Local demonstrator. Photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDiggerBURLINGTON — The city attorney aired legal and regulatory concerns with a local co-op's bid to purchase the Burlington Telecom fiber optic network. Despite those obstacles, residents overwhelmingly supported the Keep BT Local offer during Monday's City Council meeting. Keep BT Local supporters say that without the community oversight of a local cooperative, Burlington Telecom could be resold to a telecommunications giant or managed in a way that puts profits ahead of quality service and the public interest.

City Bureau and ProPublica Illinois Partner on Public Meeting Data

by David Eads, ProPublica and Darryl Holliday, City Bureau
Public meetings are important spaces for democracy, where any resident can participate and hold public figures accountable. City Bureau's Documenters program pays community members an hourly wage to attend and document public meetings, as a way to inform and engage their communities. How do Documenters know when meetings are happening? It's not easy. These events are spread across dozens of websites and are rarely available in machine-readable calendar formats like iCal.

City Connects To Telephonic History

A fledgling experiment after the Civil War. A voice, clear as a bell, on the other end of the line. A heartbeat of current and wire. A signal that the only way was onward, through person-to-person communication.This is the starting point for Exchange: This Electronic Age is Both Wondrous and Horrible, a new work from A Broken Umbrella Theatre (ABUT) based on the history of the telephone exchange in downtown New Haven.

City Council Eases Backyard Chicken Restrictions

At Thursday's City Council session, the number of backyard chickens that San Antonians can own without a permit was raised from three to eight. Council voted to approve the Animal Care Service's code amendments, including several to better define the rules for “domestic fowl” at residences, more than doubling the number of birds allowed. The […]
The post City Council Eases Backyard Chicken Restrictions appeared first on Rivard Report.

City Council Grants Credit Human $5.9 Million in Incentives

Credit Human's new 10-story headquarters at the Pearl will bring its local workforce of 435 employees into San Antonio's urban core. The post City Council Grants Credit Human $5.9 Million in Incentives appeared first on Rivard Report.

City Council Puts Brakes on Looser Taxi Regulations

Both proposals represent ongoing attempts to solve the decline in taxi service use since ride-hailing companies first came to San Antonio in 2014. The post City Council Puts Brakes on Looser Taxi Regulations appeared first on Rivard Report.

City Council Votes Yes to Chickens, No to Chains

The new laws are effective immediately, but ACS will implement a six-month, bilingual outreach campaign to help pet owners adjust to the new ordinance. The post City Council Votes Yes to Chickens, No to Chains appeared first on Rivard Report.

City Eyes Regulation Of Airbnb

Amid growing complaints from neighbors, New Haven is looking to start regulating the mushrooming Airbnb business in town — in such a way that they won't land the city in court.

City Finds $9.5M To Pay Dirty-Cop Bill

The city plans to pay restitution for a wrongful conviction by raiding some of the capital fund balances of 14 city departments, alders learned Monday night. They had some questions about that.

City Hall agrees to increased police oversight

Posted in Co-produced with WGRZ,Featured
City officials, faced with growing concerns over the conduct of Buffalo police officers, agreed Tuesday to form a citizen advisory committee with Open Buffalo, an activist organization. The commitment came during a meeting of the Common Council's Police Oversight Committee. Police Commissioner Daniel Derenda was in attendance and agreed to the advisory group. Details are to be worked out, and it is unclear whether the advisory panel will have any teeth. “I think [it will] provide more opportunities for folks in our community to be heard and for the police and council members [to] hear more directly from the community as to what they are going through,” said Danielle Johnson of Open Buffalo, who spearheaded efforts to establish the advisory body.

City Hall Could Get a $38 Million Makeover

The renovations would begin in September 2018 and require nearly 1,500 City employees from 22 departments to relocate for a 15-month period. The post City Hall Could Get a $38 Million Makeover appeared first on Rivard Report.

City Hall in Brooklyn Begins: Official Schedules for Oct. 23

9:30 AM – Mayor Bill de Blasio and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams kick off City Hall in Your Borough, before making an announcement on automobile traffic in Prospect Park. Grand Army Plaza, entrance to Prospect Park, Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn. 10:00 AM – Comptroller Scott Stringer hosts roundtable discussion with East Harlem Community Leaders. Union Settlement, 237 East 104th Street, Manhattan. 10:00 AM — The City Council Committee on Education and the Committee on Higher Education will hold a joint oversight hearing on earning an associate's degree in high school.

City Hospitals Say State Shortchanging; Challenge to Klein Afoot? Campaign Headlines for Oct. 2

“Democrats are better served when they deal with the policy challenges affecting the state rather than inventing delusional primary challenges to justify their insecurities.”
-Candice Giove, spokeswoman for Sen. Jeff Klein
* * * *
Latest updates on the Las Vegas shooting
from the New York Times
* * * *
Immigrant Raids Increasingly Target Non-Criminals
WNYC
“Between January and the end of May, 2974 immigrants without legal status were arrested in New York and New Jersey, according to federal data obtained by WNYC. That's an increase of 38 percent compared to the same period last year. The same level of increase was reported nationally by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, in President Donald Trump's first 100 days of office from late January through April. But it's a different story if you look at who's being arrested. The data showed 25 percent of those arrested in New York had no criminal convictions, up from 17 percent in the same five-month period of 2016.

City Looks to Spend $10 million on Pedestrian Projects

Raleigh's 1,190 miles of sidewalks aren't enough. Although the city-ranking website Walk Score ranks Raleigh as the country's 36th most walkable city, some streets don't have the sidewalks they need, and many streets are dangerous to cross. The group Transportation for America ranked Raleigh-Cary as the 13th most dangerous metro area for pedestrians in a 2011 study. Related:
Transportation for America Study
Raleigh's Walk Score Ranking
“I would say there are pockets that are very walkable,” said Alan Wiggs, the chair of Raleigh's Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Commission. “It all depends on where you are in Raleigh, which is kind of unfair—certain areas are walkable, other areas are not.”
Raleigh's new Comprehensive Pedestrian Plan is intended to change that, setting new standards for deciding which sidewalks get built first and establishing guidelines and best practices for sidewalk and intersection construction.

City Market announces recipients for local food projects

News Release — City Market
October 16, 2017
Contact:
Allison Hope (Formerly Weinhagen)
Director of Community Engagement, City Market
802-861-9750ahope@citymarket.coop
www.CityMarket.coop
$30,000 to be donated to support the Vermont food system
Burlington, VT – City Market has announced the 2017 recipients of its Co-op Patronage Seedling Grants, a grants program to support the local food system. In 2016, the Co-op Patronage Seedling Grant recipients received over $56,000 in grant funding to local food projects at this year's Grant Celebration held in March. City Market sent over $656,000 in Patronage Refunds to 11,450 Members in November 2016. As part of the Patronage Refund process, the Co-op offers Members the opportunity to donate their checks to strengthen Vermont's food system. Members who receive Patronage Refunds support these donations by choosing not to cash their checks within the required 90 day time period.

City of Burlington to welcome Honfleur Sister City delegation

News Release — Office of Mayor Miro Weinberger
October 9, 2017
Contact:
Katie Vane
802.734.0617
Delegation of Residents from Honfleur, France Will Visit on October 10
Burlington, VT – The City of Burlington will welcome a delegation from its Honfleur, France Sister City, including Mayor Michel Lamarre and citizens of Honfleur, at a press conference on Tuesday, October 10. This will be the second major delegation from Honfleur to visit Burlington, and the first time residents from Honfleur have joined the delegation. The last visit was in 2013. The press conference will begin at 12:30 p.m. at the Burlington Boathouse with remarks from Mayor Weinberger. Light refreshments will be served.

City of Winooski names new fire department chiefs

News Release — City of Winooski
Wednesday, October 4th 2017
Contact:
Jessie Baker, Winooski City Manager
jbaker@winooskivt.org
winooskivt.org
The City of Winooski is proud to announce a new leadership structure within the Winooski Fire Department. John J. Audy Jr., who spent the last 3 years serving Winooski as Health Administrator, Zoning Administrator, and Fire Marshal, has accepted the role of Fire Chief. John's 27 years of public safety experience provides a tremendous value to the City. His training and education includes a multitude of leadership and emergency response certifications from organizations such as the National Fire Protection Association, the Federal Emergency Management Association, and the Vermont Fire Service Training Council. When asked about his new role as Fire Chief, he stated: “It is an honor to receive this level of recognition and I'm proud to lead our firefighters and prevention staff in making Winooski a safe place to live.

City Planners Honor Gilvarg

The City Plan Commission wasn't going to let Karyn GIlvarg leave without at least a plaque and a flood of tributes to honor her more than two decades of guiding New Haven's development.

City Pursues ‘Creative Equity’ in San Antonio’s Culture Sector

The City's Arts & Culture department's new five-year strategic plan, CulTÚArt, will focus on cultural equity to make the arts accessible to all San Antonians. The post City Pursues ‘Creative Equity' in San Antonio's Culture Sector appeared first on Rivard Report.

City Releases Documents Detailing Consensus, Disagreements on Gowanus Rezoning Study

Department of City PlanningPart of a larger visualization by the Department of City Planning depicting working group recommendations on the topic of sustainability and resiliency
On Wednesday, as part of its ongoing study of Gowanus, the Department of City Planning announced the publication of a list of working group recommendations. This comes ahead of a public meeting focused on Gowanus schools, community resources and transportation that will be held on Thursday evening as part of the study. Gowanus is one of ten areas where a neighborhood rezoning is being explored, is undergoing public review or has been approved as part of the mayor's affordable housing plan. The Gowanus effort builds upon the Bridging Gowanus neighborhood planning initiative spearheaded by local councilmember Brad Lander from 2013 to 2015. In the spring, stakeholders in Gowanus participated in five different working groups, each focused on a different topic: housing, arts and culture, the public realm, sustainability and resiliency, and industry and economic development.

City Scores A “Perfect” Seven For Flood Preparedness

New Haven has built a lot of “green infrastructure,” like those Lots of green infrastructure like bioswales that catch run-off. It is also monitoring the elevation of new buildings in flood plains.

City, Artists Want ‘Creative Equity’ in San Antonio’s Culture Sector

The City's Arts & Culture department's new five-year strategic plan, CulTÚArt, will focus on cultural equity to make the arts accessible to all San Antonians. The post City, Artists Want ‘Creative Equity' in San Antonio's Culture Sector appeared first on Rivard Report.

City, County Withdraw Bid for Amazon’s New Headquarters

City and County officials announced late Wednesday that they are pulling out of the pursuit of Amazon's planned second headquarters. The post City, County Withdraw Bid for Amazon's New Headquarters appeared first on Rivard Report.

City, state officials spar over funding Harvey recovery efforts at Houston meeting

HOUSTON — With mountains of debris sitting in front yards and tens of thousands of southeast Texans still in the early stages of re-establishing their lives after Hurricane Harvey's destructive rainfall, city and state officials sparred Monday over who should cover which recovery costs — and when those funds should be disbursed. While city and state officials in the weeks immediately following Harvey's historic rainfall threw verbal support behind building and upgrading massive flood control projects and learning from past development mistakes, a Houston City Council meeting Monday foreshadowed the political and financial tensions that could complicate such efforts. The politically charged debates between State Sen. Paul Bettencourt and the Houston City Council came during the first public hearing over Mayor Sylvester Turner's proposal to raise property taxes for one year to help with some emergency costs. The council will vote on the matter next month. Bettencourt, R-Houston, and some residents portrayed the proposal as insensitive to the financial woes facing homeowners and renters grappling with the costs of repairing houses, finding new places to live, replacing vehicles and refurnishing their homes.

CityViews: Beyond Symbolism, Black Poverty Matters

The pernicious impact of America's structural racism – as symbolized by the prevalence of Confederate monuments in many locations and anger at athletes taking a knee even before the national anthem starts – is about far more than hurt feelings and painful memories. It's literally about life and death. The average life expectancy for black Americans is 4.3 years – 1,550 days – shorter than for whites. CityViews are readers' opinions, not those of City Limits. Add your voice today!Some of that early death is due to disproportionate police and community violence suffered by African Americans nationwide, but most of that is caused by disparate access to health care, as well as high rates of poverty.

CityViews: Bill-Signing Marked the End of Tenants’ 4-Year Struggle

Edwin J. Torres/Mayoral Photography Office.Mayor de Blasio at an October 16 event where he signed several bills, including Intro. 934-A, which creates a real-time enforcement unit within DOB; Intro. 1359-A requires HPD to audit buildings receiving tax-exemptions to ensure compliance with affordability requirements; and Intro. 1366-A requires HPD to audit certain buildings receiving tax-emptions to ensure compliance with rent-registration requirements. On October 16, 2017, Mayor De Blasio signed the final of 12 pieces of legislation into law to protect tenants from construction as harassment.

CityViews: Community Land Trusts are a Path to Affordable Homeownership

Bjoertvedt‘The community land trust model is one of the few that can touch on the homeownership needs of communities such as Southeast Queens and the Rockaways.' New York City's affordable housing crisis needs a long-term solution and one that addresses the needs of low-income families seeking to become first-time homeowners. For many years, affordable homes were created through public investment, but little thought was given to how long they would remain affordable. Now is the time for the city and community partners to learn from the oversights of the past and create new, affordable housing units that achieve two goals: First, meet the growing needs of our city and, second, maintain permanent affordability for future generations. The Community Land Trust (CLTs) model satisfies both of these needs.

CityViews: Constitutional Convention is New York’s Only Opportunity for Change

Office of the GovernorJune 6, 2011, Albany – Governor Cuomo and legislative leaders announce agreement on historic ethics reform at a Capitol news conference. Since then, Skelos and Stringer have been tried on corruption charges and aides to the governor have been targeted by a federal investigation. Are you satisfied living in a state:
having a bloated, 50,000 word constitution that is a concatenation of oddities, anachronisms, contradictory provisions and material declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court? in which legislative leaders are allowed to accumulate unchecked power absent controls such as term limits or limits on leadership terms? in which a greater number of legislators and state officeholders than in any other state–more than 30 in the past decade–have been convicted, sanctioned or accused of wrongdoing?

CityViews: Lives Could Be Saved if NYC’s Shelters Had Naloxone Training

Premier of AlbertaNaloxone works by blocking opioid receptors so that a person can regain the ability to breathe. One morning, I entered the bathroom of the Brooklyn homeless shelter I was living in to find a man unconscious with a needle sticking out of his arm. I knew this was an overdose, so I ran to my room to get my naloxone, a medicine that reverses an opioid overdose. When I returned to the bathroom, a shelter guard was there. He stopped me from getting to the man, a kid really.

CityViews: Long Island City does not need a Vertical ‘Country-Club’ on Public Land

Haruka SakaguchiOne of two public sites that EDC plans to give to the private developer TF Cornerstone for a 1,000 unit residential project. The public land is located right next to other waterfront, luxury properties developed by TF Cornerstone. There's something different about the newest luxury towers planned for Long Island City's waterfront. The private developer, TF Cornerstone, has already developed 6 waterfront LIC properties, but this time, it plans to build on public, city-owned land—one of the few remaining parcels in Long Island City. Earlier this year, the NYC Economic Development Corporation (EDC) announced its selection of TF Cornerstone to redevelop the public site.

CityViews: NY Must Expand Coverage for Allergy Testing

NIHMedicaid recipients only have access to skin prick testing, which is almost exclusively available through allergy specialists. As the actions of the current administration in Washington have made clear, the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is quite uncertain. It is therefore imperative that New York State responds, not only by considering comprehensive policies that could replace the ACA at the state level, like implementing a single payer system, but also by working to enact policies that aim to improve the system we currently have in place. One simple step our state can take to improve access to health care and reduce health disparities among its residents would be to cover allergy blood tests under Medicaid. The absence of comprehensive allergy testing coverage in our state's Medicaid program, which would include both blood-based and skin prick allergy testing, disproportionately affects low-income and minority communities.

CityViews: Queens House of Detention Could Be Refuge for the Homeless

William Alatriste for the City CouncilCouncilmember Karen Koslowitz, at the podium, is one of a group of Queens legislators who have said they'd support reopening the House of Detention as a jail. A majority of Queens's City Council members and two of the borough's community groups are at odds over the future of the erstwhile Queens House of Detention. The Council members want it to operate again as a jail. The community groups—no surprise—are opposed. How about a novel compromise that would address a grave city affliction: turning the facility into a homeless residence?

Classics for Kids

Pop-up concert for children on Oct. 28Classics for Kids was first posted on October 23, 2017 at 7:03 am.

Clean Neighborhood Quest Starts Here

When dozens of government workers swarm into Newhallville next week on a new “Clean City” quest for clues about what makes blocks thrive or decay, they might want to pop in on Levon Quattlebaum and Alberta Nelson on Bassett Street.

Clear the Air Coalition’s Ties to Sempra Aren’t Always Clear to the Public

A new group known as the Clear the Air coalition has risen up to discourage the city of San Diego from taking on San Diego Gas & Electric. The city wants 100 percent of electricity sold within city limits to come from renewable sources by 2035. SDG&E argues that it's too risky and too expensive to abandon natural gas-fired power right now. So, the city is thinking about buying energy for its 1.4 million residents by becoming a community choice aggregator, or CCA. The City Council could vote on the switch in the next several months.

Clear the Chemicals

County will accept hazardous wasteClear the Chemicals was first posted on October 2, 2017 at 7:21 am.

Cleveland School District disputes racism allegation over valedictorian

Kelsey Davis, Mississippi TodayStudents load a Cleveland School District bus outside of the new Cleveland Central High School. CLEVELAND — School officials accused of discriminating against an African-American student are denying charges that they took extraordinary steps to have that student share valedictorian honors with a white student. A federal lawsuit filed by the student's parent earlier this year claims that the African-American student was forced to share her valedictorian role with a white student, despite having a higher grade point average. “[Cleveland School District] had a legitimate, non-discriminatory valedictorian policy which was race neutral and applied in a racially neutral manner,” states a court filing on behalf of defendants Cleveland School District, superintendent Jacquelyn Thigpen and then-Cleveland High School principal Steven Craddock. Their response says the two students held identical grade point averages (GPA).

Cleveland School District disputes racism allegation over valedictorian

Kelsey Davis, Mississippi TodayStudents load a Cleveland School District bus outside of the new Cleveland Central High School. CLEVELAND — School officials accused of discriminating against an African-American student are denying charges that they took extraordinary steps to have that student share valedictorian honors with a white student. A federal lawsuit filed by the student's parent earlier this year claims that the African-American student was forced to share her valedictorian role with a white student, despite having a higher grade point average. “[Cleveland School District] had a legitimate, non-discriminatory valedictorian policy which was race neutral and applied in a racially neutral manner,” states a court filing on behalf of defendants Cleveland School District, superintendent Jacquelyn Thigpen and then-Cleveland High School principal Steven Craddock. Their response says the two students held identical grade point averages (GPA).

Climate change causing big shifts in tropical forests

It's well known that climate change is significantly affecting the world's oceans as sea level rise and water acidifies. But forests are also experiencing big impacts. Shifting precipitation patterns are bringing droughts to the Amazon rainforest, and warmer winter temperatures are allowing tree-killing beetles to move farther north in boreal regions. Now, new research finds that climate change may be making tropical forests "move." A study published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that over the last decade, tropical forests in north-western Colombia have been shrinking and changing directionally with time as a likely response to climate change.

Clock ticking on decision affecting Vermont’s telecom future

Gov. Phil Scott speaks at a press conference Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. Photo by Erin Mansfield/VTDigger.org
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Phil Scott" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/IMG_8593.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Gov. Phil Scott. File photo by Erin Mansfield/VTDiggerThe 90-day clock has started ticking for Gov. Phil Scott to make a key decision about the future of public safety communications — and Vermont's broader telecommunications networks. But some see the process of developing a recommendation for the governor as skewed toward one vendor and lacking in needed information.

CNN debate: Sanders spars with GOP senators over health care

WASHINGTON — Hours after a last-ditch effort to repeal Obamacare was derailed, four senators faced off on CNN over health care reform. Republicans Bill Cassidy, of Louisiana, and Lindsey Graham, of South Carolina, touted their proposal, which features reductions in Medicaid payments to states and the repeal of mandates under the Affordable Care Act. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., defended Obamacare and promoted a universal health care system.RELATED STORIESGOP fails to muster votes for Obamacare repealSenate Republicans make another bid for Obamacare repeal
The hour-and-a-half-long debate was held shortly after Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, announced she would not support Graham and Cassidy's bill. With her dissenting vote, Republicans fell short of the 50 votes needed for passage. Graham said they weren't giving up.

Co-op survives next step in bidding process for Burlington Telecom

Keep BT Local demonstrator. Photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Keep BT Local demonstrator" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Keep-BT-Local-3.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Keep BT Local demonstrator. Photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDiggerBURLINGTON — A local co-op seeking to purchase Burlington Telecom will be among the two final bidders after a City Council vote Monday, much to the elation of supporters who packed City Hall. Burlington Telecom is currently owned by a holding company that leases its assets back to the city, an arrangement reached nearly a decade ago when the fiber network was in dire financial straits. The city improperly plowed $17 million of Burlington taxpayer money into the venture.

Coaching greats, the late Archie Moore highlight MSHOF’s Class of 2018

The Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2018 will include some of the most successful coaches – in a variety of sports – in Magnolia State history. In my view, several were long overdue. Introduced Monday at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum, they are former Ole Miss football star and head football coach Billy Brewer; long-time Mississippi College head basketball coach (now athletic director) Mike Jones; nine-time State Champion girls basketball coach (Murrah High) Anna Jackson; Lafayette Stribling, who won several state championships as a high school coach and seven SWAC championships at Mississippi Valley State; and Joe Walker, Jr., who coached Olympians and All Americans in track and field at Ole Miss. Rick Cleveland
Also voted into the MSHOF Class of 2018 is the late Archie Moore, the longest reigning world light heavyweight boxing champion of all-time, who recorded 132 knockouts, the most in professional boxing history. The Class of 2018 will be inducted at the annual induction banquet on July 28, 2018 at the Jackson Convention Center.

Cochran returns to Washington as health questions swirl

Bill Clark, CQ Roll Call via AP ImagesSen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss., is seen prior to a Senate Appropriations subcommittee meeting in June. Sen. Thad Cochran, who delayed his trip back to Washington early this week after health complications, returned to Washington on Tuesday. As Senate Appropriations chairman, Cochran is needed at the Capitol to chair key budget meetings as Republicans look to pass budget and tax cuts in the coming weeks. “I am pleased to be back in Washington where I look forward to continuing work on the 2018 appropriations bills and to taking part in the debate on the budget and tax cuts,” Cochran said in a statement released by his staff. “I appreciate all the support and kind words I received while at home.”
The 79-year-old Republican senator, who has been recovering at his Oxford home from a urological infection since mid-September, said two times previously that he would return to Washington on Monday as the Senate returned from a recess.

CodeNEXT Opposition Organizing in Earnest

CodeNEXT Opposition Organizing in Earnest
Neighborhood activists launching efforts todrum up support and raise campaign funds
By Ken Martin© The Austin Bulldog 2017Posted Tuesday October 10, 2017 7:13am
Central city residents are up in arms over perceptions that the work in progress called CodeNEXT, a complete overhaul of the City of Austin's Land Development Code, will wreak havoc on their neighborhoods and way of life. The Austin Bulldog previously reported on the three petition drives launched by IndyAustin, one of which if approved by voters would slow down CodeNEXT and put the matter to a public vote before it could be implemented. The first get-together to rally support against CodeNEXT was held October 3 at the home of Charlotte Herzele, where several speakers addressed what they said are shortcomings in the plan that will have an undesirable impact on how the city is redeveloped. Carmen Llanes Pulido, executive director of Go Austin/Vamos Austin and the host's daughter, said CodeNEXT is based on the false premise that, “If we open the doors of development it will take care of the problems of East Austin, but I don't believe the growth machine is so easily satiated.”
She said that density is not bringing affordability to East Austin and policy changes are needed to provide truly affordable housing. “If we cannot ameliorate the effects of rapid growth we should not accelerate growth,” said Pulido, who was a member of the Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission that drew the boundaries of the 10 geographic City Council districts implemented in the 2014 elections.

Coffee Pedaler, Neighbors Square Off

For months, Ryan Taylor has been trying to expand his East Rock coffee shop into an after-hours wine bar. If his East and State Street neighbors have their say, that may not happen anytime soon.

Colchester police dispatcher charged

COLCHESTER — A police dispatcher is facing charges for allegedly paying a woman for sex and sharing information with her about an ongoing federal investigation. The charges were filed this week in Chittenden County Superior Court, and Earl Benway, 41, of Milton, is scheduled to appear in court on October 10, according to state police. He is accused of obstruction of justice and prohibited acts. Fired Colchester police dispatcher Earl Benway is charged with obstruction of justice and prohibited acts. Courtesy photo, Vermont State Police.

Collective Soul

At this Beacon gallery, the artists run the placeCollective Soul was first posted on October 15, 2017 at 9:56 am.

Colorado bows to federal pressure, adopts second school quality system that penalizes schools for testing opt-out

In an effort to keep federal dollars flowing to Colorado classrooms, the State Board of Education voted Wednesday to create two quality systems for the state's schools — the existing one designed in 2009 by state lawmakers, and a new one that meets federal requirements. The unusual arrangement amounts to a compromise between the state education department and the U.S. Department of Education. After Colorado became a national epicenter for the opt-out movement in 2015, the State Board of Education adopted a policy that did not count students who opted out of the tests in the school's average test score. Students who missed the test and were not excused by parents still counted against a school's score. That proved to be a sticking point when state officials submitted Colorado's plan for complying with the nation's new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Colorado bows to federal pressure, adopts second school quality system that penalizes schools for testing opt-out

In an effort to keep federal dollars flowing to Colorado classrooms, the State Board of Education voted Wednesday to create two quality systems for the state's schools — the existing one designed in 2009 by state lawmakers, and a new one that meets federal requirements. The unusual arrangement amounts to a compromise between the state education department and the U.S. Department of Education. After Colorado became a national epicenter for the opt-out movement in 2015, the State Board of Education adopted a policy that did not count students who opted out of the tests in the school's average test score. Students who missed the test and were not excused by parents still counted against a school's score. That proved to be a sticking point when state officials submitted Colorado's plan for complying with the nation's new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Colorado DREAMer makes his case in Washington

This week, I had the unique opportunity to fly to Washington D.C. and join Dreamers from across the country to advocate for the Dream Act. In its current form, the Dream Act, which was first introduced in 2001, would implement a permanent legislative solution for DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] recipients, providing protection from deportation and work authorization for hardworking individuals who came here at a young age. On Sept. 5, 2017, after pressure from Attorneys General from 10 states, President Donald Trump made the decision to rescind DACA, a program that has dramatically transformed the lives of nearly one million Americans-in-waiting – including mine. DACA has allowed me to do so much in the last five years, and finally helped me come out of the shadows and embrace my identity as an American and as an immigrant.

Colorado Electoral College Lawsuit: A deal for SUPCO to hear a big case faster?

Colorado's GOP secretary of state Wayne Williams and attorneys for three members of the 2016 Electoral College class who are suing him for voter intimidation are involved in a game of Let's Make a Deal. They aren't talking about settling. Rather, the two sides are working behind the scenes to see if they can reach an agreement that might get a case heard before the U.S. Supreme Court as quickly and efficiently as possible. The case involves a federal lawsuit filed in August that claims Williams intimidated former national electors Bob Nemanich, Polly Baca and Micheal Baca (no relation to Polly) when he enforced a state law requiring them to cast their Electoral College votes for Hillary Clinton because she won Colorado's popular vote in the 2016 presidential election. Related: Electoral College members file voter ‘intimidation' lawsuit against Colorado's secretary of state
The goal is for the nation's highest court to answer a fundamental question about the Electoral College: Do its 538 members have the constitutional right to vote for whomever they want regardless of what individual state laws, like Colorado's, say?

Colorado moves to dismiss complaint seeking ‘person’ status for Colorado River

The state of Colorado moved in federal court this week to dismiss a lawsuit from an environmental group and five of its members who are seeking to declare the Colorado River ecosystem a “person” and represent its interest in court. In a filing from the Attorney General's Office on Tuesday, Oct. 17, Colorado told the U.S. District Court in Denver that Deep Green Resistance and its members do not have jurisdiction to sue the state in federal court under the 11th Amendment, do not have standing in the case due to lack of a specific injury and do not state a claim “upon which relief can be granted.”
“The complaint alleges hypothetical future injuries that are neither fairly traceable to actions of the state of Colorado, nor redressable by a declaration that the ecosystem is a ‘person' capable of possessing rights,” the state told the federal court. Colorado said the questions of “whether the ecosystem should have the same rights as people, and who should be allowed to assert those rights in federal courts, are matters reserved to Congress by the Constitution.”
The case — Colorado River Ecosystem a/n/f Deep Green Resistance v. the State of Colorado — is being heard by U.S. District Court Judge Nina Wang, and a status conference is set for Nov. 14.

Colorado State Board of Education adopts new early literacy rules for native Spanish speakers, reversing earlier decision

The State Board of Education ended a two-year debate over how to measure the reading skills of Colorado's youngest students learning English as a second language after it unanimously adopted Wednesday new policies to comply with a legislative compromise passed last spring. The rule change applies to English learners who whose native language is Spanish. Under the board-approved policy, school districts will be able to choose whether to test students who have limited English proficiency in either English or Spanish. The board, at the request of associations representing school executives and boards of education, backed off additional reporting requirements that were outside the scope of the legislation. But the new guidelines do provide parents the right to request students be tested in English, and requires school districts that reject such a request to share their reasoning with parents.

Colorado wants to help these 230 schools improve learning. Here’s the state’s first step.

More than 200 Colorado schools, most with vast and stubborn achievement gaps, could be eligible under new federal guidelines for a slice of $11 million in state and federal school improvement grants and aid. The state education department earlier this month notified school districts — from the suburban Cherry Creek to the rural Burlington — of their eligibility to apply for the money and other state services. This list of schools, which Chalkbeat obtained in a request, and a companion grant application that has yet to be released are part of Colorado's yet-to-be approved plan to comply with the nation's new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA. The new law requires states like Colorado, which under a waiver from the previous federal law focused most of its time and resources on schools failing most students, to also focus attention on schools that are leaving some historically disadvantaged students behind. The state used results from its preliminary school quality ratings — which help the state spot schools that need help improving learning — and new federal guidelines to identify which schools should make the list.

Colorado wants to help these 230 schools improve learning. Here’s the state’s first step.

More than 200 Colorado schools, most with vast and stubborn achievement gaps, could be eligible under new federal guidelines for a slice of $11 million in state and federal school improvement grants and aid. The state education department earlier this month notified school districts — from the suburban Cherry Creek to the rural Burlington — of their eligibility to apply for the money and other state services. This list of schools, which Chalkbeat obtained in a request, and a companion grant application that has yet to be released are part of Colorado's yet-to-be approved plan to comply with the nation's new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA. The new law requires states like Colorado, which under a waiver from the previous federal law focused most of its time and resources on schools failing most students, to also focus attention on schools that are leaving some historically disadvantaged students behind. The state used results from its preliminary school quality ratings — which help the state spot schools that need help improving learning — and new federal guidelines to identify which schools should make the list.

Colorado’s ethics watchdog will stop watching. Here’s why.

Colorado Ethics Watch, the nonprofit that has made transparency and accountability in state and local government its business since 2006, is shutting down in December. The Independent checked in with executive director Luis Toro on Wednesday to discuss why, and what his group's closure means for our square, swing state. The Indy: Sad news, Luis. We and other news outlets count on Ethics Watch and your work. What happened?

Colorado’s Growing Suicide Rate Thrown into Relief by Williams Tragedy

Suicide is a rising public health dilemma in Colorado, where 1,004 residents took their own lives last year, according to the state health department. The state's suicide rate has jumped 19 percent in the past decade, and is particularly high among middle-age and older men.

Columbia, an example to world, balances conservation and development

Luis Gilberto Murillo, Colombia's minister of the environment and sustainable development. Photo by Enrique Ortiz, Andes Amazon Fund WASHINGTON, D.C. – The minister was running late. “Colombian time,” his communications assistant from Bogota told me with a shrug. She had arranged for an exclusive Mongabay interview with Luis Gilberto Murillo, Colombia's minister of the environment and sustainable development, a Q&A scheduled at the National Geographic Society headquarters just prior to the society honoring Colombian President Juan Santos for his prodigious efforts in protecting biodiversity since taking office in 2010. Murillo came into the president's orbit in 2014 while working for Santos' presidential re-election as a campaign officer in the Pacific region, where he is a native of Chocó, one of the poorest departments in the country.

ComEd wants to bill ratepayers for microgrid; critics, including Attorney General, cry foul

Less than a year after state funding for microgrids was rejected by the Illinois legislature, the utility ComEd is turning to ratepayers. In a filing before the Illinois Commerce Commission, the ComEd is asking for permission to charge its 3.8 million customers for the cost of building a $25 million microgrid in Chicago that will serve 1,060 customers and institutions including a police headquarters and nursing homes. The request has highlighted fundamental questions about the role microgrids might play within traditional urban grids, their benefits and limitations and who should pay for them. The debate also underscores how utilities are trying to adapt to a changing energy landscape, and in the process potentially challenging or expanding their legally proscribed roles — especially in deregulated energy states — in ways some call questionable. ComEd wants to treat the microgrid it seeks to build in the Bronzeville neighborhood like it would any other infrastructure for electricity delivery, recouping the costs from ratepayers across its territory and earning a rate of return in the process.

Commentary: A hidden danger on campus

Meningitis is a disease that can be fatal, and infections often occur in young adults. Rubin
Yet many college students aren't vaccinated for meningitis B, which accounts for about 40 percent of cases, says Dr. Mitzi Rubin of Marietta. In a new GHN Commentary, Rubin says that “parents may think their children are protected when they leave for college, not realizing that the current meningitis vaccine doesn't cover the B strain.”
“Parents may need to ask specifically for the meningitis B vaccine in order for their students to receive it,'' she adds. Here's a link to her Commentary. By Andy Miller for Georgia Health News, 2016.

Commentary: How the Midwest benefits from the clean jobs revolution

When people think of clean energy, environmental benefits are usually the first that spring to mind. Mark Pischea is the Managing Partner of Sterling Corporation, a Republican political consulting firm, and President of the Conservative Energy Network. There's nothing wrong with that. We all benefit from cleaner air and water, and all things being equal, Americans want pollution to be reduced. But there's a lesser known but equally important benefit to the clean energy revolution: a jobs boom that is boosting economic growth, creating middle class jobs, and attracting billions of dollars in new investment.

Commentary: St. Louis arts organizations provide a variety of educational opportunities

We see and hear art at our many art venues around town and most, both large and small institutions and venues, have exciting education programs. I'll just highlight a few of them. Jack Lane of Stages says, "Entering its second decade of teaching, the Stages Performing Arts Academy in Chesterfield and its Outreach Programs throughout the community, annually reach over 5,000 students, from classes in music, voice, dance, and drama to regionally unique programs for children with physical, cognitive and developmental delays, Stages has had a profound effect on the study of the performing arts in St. Louis.” CAM, The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, has featured its "New Art in the Neighborhood" for decades. It's a program in which teens work with visiting artists and build their own portfolio.

Commission on Act 250: the Next 50 Years convenes first meeting

News Release — Commission on Act 250
October 10, 2017
Contact:
Faith Brown
Phone: (802) 828-2231
Fax: (802) 828-2424
E-mail: fbrown@leg.state.vt.us
The Commission on Act 250: the Next 50 Years convened its first meeting on September 21, 2017. Three more meetings will occur this fall during the first phase of the Commission's work:
Wednesday October 25, 2017
Wednesday November 15, 2017
Wednesday December 13, 2017
These meetings will be from 10 – 4 in room 11 at the State House and are open to the public. The Commission was created by 2017 Acts and Resolves No. 47 (Act 47). The Commission's report is due December 15, 2018.

Common Sense Media Strives to be ‘AARP for Kids’

A California nonprofit organization which rates children's media recently announced that it plans to become an advocate for educational technology, early childhood education and other issues. The San Francisco-based organization, Common Sense Media, offers free reviews and ratings of children's media, including television shows, movies, video games and apps. The organization's founder and chief executive, James P. Steyer, said he plans to use the 65 million users as “an army of advocates for kids.”
“Our goal is to be AARP for kids,” Steyer said in a telephone interview Monday. “We're going to ask people to step up and make kids and education the number one priority in this country.”
Steyer added that the group plans to urge state lawmakers into action on a broad range of topics including access to digital classroom technology and the privacy of student data in order to improve upon career and technical education, as well as childhood poverty, writes Emma Brown for The Washington Post. “We have a simple mission: to make kids and education the nation's top priority,” said Steyer.

Community College of Vermont faculty overwhelmingly vote yes to union

News Release — CCV:
October 12, 2017
Contacts:
Emily Casey 802.338.2436emilyclairecasey@gmail.com
Matt McGrath 802.373.0133matt.mcgrath@aftvermont.org
MONTPELIER, VT — Ballots from 435 Community College of Vermont (CCV) faculty were counted Thursday at the Vermont Labor Relations Board. CCV faculty voted by mail on the question of whether to join the AFT Vermont union. 300 CCV faculty voted yes to join AFT Vermont (70% of ballots cast) in order to negotiate for an improved CCV for faculty and students. The final tally was 300 voting for the union, 131 opposed, and 4 spoiled ballots. “This is a very exciting moment for faculty,” said Emily Casey a CCV Faculty member from the Winooski Campus.

Community Health Centers Put Out Funding SOS Call

Thousands of fragile and vulnerable patients — including many potentially arriving from the unfolding humanitarian crisis in hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico — may lose access to health care at community centers in New Haven and across the cities of Connecticut. Meanwhile, others will be helped by fewer staffers coordinating their care.

Community Health Centers to expand services with HHS grants

News Release — Department of Health and Human Services
Oct. 13, 2017
Contact:
Susan Noon
(603)228-2830 x 144
STEPPING UP TO TREAT THOSE IN NEED
VERMONT – Oct. 13, 2017 – The federal Department of Health and Human Services announced that 10 of Vermont's 11 Federally Qualified Health Centers will receive approximately $175,000 each in grants to increase the number of personnel providing mental health services, including treatment and recovery services for substance use disorders. The AIMS grant (Access Increases in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services) further enables health centers to leverage health information technology to support the increased demand for services. The grant funding is especially critical in Vermont where more than 6,000 people are currently receiving treatment for substance use disorders and yet, the number of people seeking help for heroin overdoses at hospital Emergency departments more than doubled over the past year.1
The unique environment of integrated primary care, including medical, oral and mental health care services that are available at Health Centers in Vermont is ideal for all patients, especially those with the complex health issues that often accompany substance use disorders.

Community partners honored at Windsor County Partners’ anniversary celebration

News Release — Windsor County Partners
October 6, 2017
Contact:
Jennifer Grant
Windsor County Partners
802-674-5101wcmentors@outlook.com
The local youth mentoring organization, Windsor County Partners, celebrated its 43rd birthday at its annual luncheon, held on Wednesday, September 27th, at the beautiful Windsor Mansion Inn. The attendees included board members, mentors, other volunteers, supporters, and staff. Also included were special guests receiving awards on behalf of their organizations. WCP marked the event by conferring three special awards:
The Co-Op Food Stores received the WCP Community Spirit Award in recognition for support for special events and for donating Pennies for Change proceeds to WCP. The award was accepted by Co-op Board President William Craig and Co-op staff representative April Harkness.

Community rallies around moose poaching incident, raises funds for reward

News Release — Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department
October 19, 2017
Media Contacts:
Col. Jason Batchelder, 802-828-1483
Lt. Dave Gregory, 802-751-0103
WESTMORE, Vt. – A Go Fund Me campaign has been started to raise reward money for an unsolved moose poaching case that took place in September. The campaign was started by Craftsbury Common resident Cindi Bollettieri. A cow moose was shot from the road out of season and at night on Saturday, September 23.

Community reels from substitute teacher Nazi salute

Some in the northwestern Vermont town of Georgia just want to put behind them an incident in which a long-time substitute teacher was fired for teaching third-graders the Nazi salute and to say “Heil Hitler.”
Others remain perplexed and say they're having a hard time separating the incident at the Georgia Elementary and Middle School from a resurgence of white supremacy and neo-Nazism nationally. The long-term substitute teacher, who was filling in for a regular teacher who was out on maternity leave, was fired immediately after the administration was made aware of the events on September 21, school Superintendent Ned Kirsch said in an interview Thursday. Kirsch said the substitute teacher, whom he refused to identify, had asked the children to line up, extend their right arms and touch the right shoulder of the pupil in line in front of them — a common technique used to ensure adequate space between children queuing up. She then modeled raising her arm somewhat higher and told the children, “And now we say ‘Heil Hitler',” Kirsch said. The incident was first reported by the Burlington-based newspaper Seven Days.

Companies given edge over local Burlington Telecom suitor

Financial and legal documents released Wednesday carry opinions that favor two established telecommunications companies over a local group in the sale of Burlington Telecom. A certified public accountant and the city's legal counsel both raise concerns about Keep Burlington Telecom Local, a local group that wants to buy the municipally run and controlled internet and TV provider for $12 million and operate it as a member-owned cooperative. The city would retain an ownership interest. Burlington Telecom's offices in Burlington. Photo by Erin Mansfield/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em.jpg?fit=610%2C458&ssl=1" src="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em-300x225.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1" alt="Burlington Telecom" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em.jpg?resize=125%2C94&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em.jpg?resize=610%2C458&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em.jpg?resize=150%2C113&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Burlington-Telecom-em.jpg?w=1024&ssl=1 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1">Burlington Telecom's offices in Burlington.

Compassionate Civilization

Author to speak at Desmond-FishCompassionate Civilization was first posted on October 3, 2017 at 7:42 am.

Competing with Trump, a social worker speaks for Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria announced its landfall near Yabucoa, P.R., with a terrible wailing. Sustained winds of 155 miles per hour shredded the electric grid, flattened trees, scoured gardens and ruined the back of the sturdy cement home of a retired Hartford school social worker, Janette Hernandez. "I still hear that sound in my head,” she said. Hernandez is back in Connecticut, giving voice to the stories of people she left behind.

Complaints surge about weed killer dicamba’s damage to oak trees

As soybean and cotton farmers across the Midwest and South continue to see their crops ravaged from the weed killer dicamba, new complaints have pointed to the herbicide as a factor in widespread damage to oak trees. Monsanto and BASF, two of agriculture's largest seed and pesticide providers, released versions of the dicamba this growing season. The new versions came several months after Monsanto released its latest cotton and soybean seeds genetically engineered to resist dicamba in 2016. Since then, farmers across the Midwest and South have blamed drift from dicamba for ruining millions of acres of soybeans and cotton produced by older versions of seeds. Now, complaints have emerged that the misuse of dicamba may be responsible for damage to oak trees in Iowa, Illinois and Tennessee.

Complaints Surge About Weed Killer Dicamba’s Damage To Oak Trees

As soybean and cotton farmers across the Midwest and South continue to see their crops ravaged from the weed killer dicamba, new complaints have pointed to the herbicide as a factor in widespread damage to oak trees. Monsanto and BASF, two of agriculture's largest seed and pesticide providers, released versions of the dicamba this growing season. The new versions came several months after Monsanto released its latest cotton and soybean seeds genetically engineered to resist dicamba in 2016. Since then, farmers across the Midwest and South have blamed drift from dicamba for ruining millions of acres of soybeans and cotton produced by older versions of seeds. Now, complaints have emerged that the misuse of dicamba may be responsible for damage to oak trees in Iowa, Illinois and Tennessee.

Compromise Found On Gas Station Marts

New Haven's zoners offered a Solomonic solution for a debate between neighbors and developers over whether to allow a convenience store in an industrial zone: How about a kiosk instead?

Concealed Gun Laws’ Fate May Rest With D.C. Case

Washington, D.C., Attorney General Karl Racine will decide this week whether to ask the Supreme Court to review a ruling striking down the city's restrictions on carrying concealed guns — a choice that could determine the fate of similar laws in cities such as New York and Los Angeles, the Washington Post reports. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit rejected a D.C. law that requires residents to demonstrate a “good reason” to obtain a permit to carry a gun in public. Appealing to the Supreme Court would give the city a chance to save the law. It would also open a window for the justices to further constrain the power of cities and states to regulate firearms. In 2007, the appeal of a ruling finding D.C.'s handgun ban unconstitutional led to a high court decision establishing that the Second Amendment guarantees an individual right to bear arms.
If the justices decide to hear the new case, similar restrictions in states including California, New York, Maryland, Massachusetts, Hawaii, New Jersey and Connecticut will hang in the balance. Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh said, “Really it's the fate of the whole country you have in your hands when you're making this call.

Condominium total loss after Ridgemark fire, two residents slightly injured

Ridgemark fire destroys condominium as two are slightly injured. Eighteen firefighters bring fire under control in 40 minutes.

Condos: Vermont ready for cyberattacks against voting systems

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos. Photo by Mike Dougherty/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Jim Condos" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/IMG_1765-3.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos. Photo by Mike Dougherty/VTDiggerAmid recent reports about vulnerabilities to U.S. election systems, Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos says local voters won't see many changes at their polling places in 2018. But that doesn't mean his office isn't paying close attention to cybersecurity. “We are constantly looking at it,” Condos said.

Congress clears short-term FAA extension

WASHINGTON — The House and Senate passed a bill Thursday that authorizes the operations for the Federal Aviation Administration for six more months, averting a partial shutdown of some aviation programs.
The short-term extension passed just two days before authorization was set to expire on September 30. According to Politico, failure to extend FAA authorization could impact airport funding and result in furlough of thousands of workers. Officials in Vermont say federal support through the FAA is critical to aviation programs in the state. A draft of a long-term FAA reauthorization bill stalled in Congress earlier this year as House Republicans worked to get support for a controversial measure included in the legislation that would privatize the air traffic control program. Though the concept of privatizing air traffic control operations has high profile supporters, including President Donald Trump, the level of support in Congress was not clear.

Congress jeopardizes health insurance for 11,300 NM children

The Affordable Care Act and its Medicaid expansion will live on following the death Sept. 27 of congressional Republicans' last-ditch effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, but uncertainty remains for thousands of families in New Mexico whose children are covered through the Children's Health Insurance Program. Congress allowed funding for the program to expire over […]

Congress to miss deadline to renew CT children’s health program

WASHINGTON — Congress will miss a Saturday deadline to renew a program that provides 17,000 Connecticut children with health care coverage, but, in its latest accounting, the state's Department of Social Services says it has enough money to continue the program into next year.

Congress: Fix the market bug, with Carbon Fee and Dividend

My day job is working for Microsoft as a technical account manager. My responsibilities include making sure that companies who use our products and services are getting value from them. If something with our software breaks, it falls on me and a team of technical engineers to help resolve the issue. Going through a major issue is never fun. It creates undue stress, and many times is preventable through a change in process or education.

Connecticut to Nevada: Sharing condolences, hard lessons

It's a select club of unhappy conscripts, and membership comes with responsibilities. It meant reaching out to Gov. Dannel P. Malloy after the massacre of 26 children and educators at Sandy Hook nearly five years ago. On Monday, it was Malloy's turn. He called the mayor of Las Vegas and governor of Nevada to offer condolences and assistance.

Connections: Is Big Tech too big?

Is Big Tech too big? Buzzfeed's Ben Smith, among other writers, are saying that Big Tech is in trouble. He says Facebook and Google are too big, too powerful, too complacent -- and soon, both consumers and Congress will come for them. Is he right? Is Facebook primed for a fall?

Connolly to leave vets’ post, possibly to run for governor

Sean Connolly, who has been talking to fellow Democrats about running for governor in 2018, is stepping down Wednesday as the state commissioner of veterans affairs, the governor's office announced Friday.

Conservation in a weak state: Madagascar struggles with enforcement

RANOMAFANA NATIONAL PARK, Madagascar — Late in the afternoon on June third of this year, Pierette Razafiandravao was at home getting ready for a church outing the following day when she heard gunshots in the distance. At the time, she didn't think much of it. Armed cattle rustlers have become a disturbingly common presence in her corner of southern Madagascar, and that morning she'd gotten word of a standoff between soldiers on patrol and a group of bandits a few miles north of her house. It was only later that she realized she'd heard the bullets that killed her husband. When police arrived at the scene, they found his motorcycle neatly parked, leaning on its kickstand, along with his cell phone and his wallet, which still had money in it.

Conservation leaders in Africa call for a crackdown on biopiracy

Today, Malaysia is one of the world's biggest producers of palm oil. Together with Indonesia, the Southeast Asian country contributes some 85 percent of the global supply. But this has not always been the case. In the 1970s the industry was having a hard time taking hold in Malaysia, due in large part to pollination difficulties. Native to western Africa, the oil palm tree species from which most palm oil is produced (Ealais guineensis) had no natural pollinators in Southeast Asia, forcing plantation workers to laboriously pollinate by hand or simply hope that wind would be enough to transport pollen from one tree to another.

Conserving habitat not enough to help species cope with climate change

The changes wrought by climate change on the conditions that support life on Earth force some plants and animals into different ranges. To address this issue, certain conservation strategies aim to help these species by protecting and restoring the places where they're most likely to move. But a new study, published today in the journal Nature Climate Change, suggests that these tactics might fall short and in the end fail to keep some species from going extinct. Grasshoppers benefited most from conservation measures in the study. Photo by John C. Cannon.

Considering the question: Given Vietnam’s horrors, is Trump really worse than JFK and LBJ?

Eric Black

I'm fairly desperate for ways to feel better about the current incumbent. This is a pretty twisted one, but I seem to have tried to find solace in it almost every day since I found it in my inbox.An old friend whom I haven't seen in more than a year reached out one recent day, most of the way through the Ken Burns/PBS Vietnam War series, with this:Eric, Sorry, I have nobody else to express this to other than you. ... I'm sure I despise Trump almost as much as you but in watching the Vietnam series on television I keep thinking: Is Trump really worse than JFK or LBJ?So far, at least, Trump hasn't laid waste to millions of lives to protect his political career.I realize there's nothing shockingly new in the Vietnam series, still seeing it laid out clearly, hour after hour, I'm surprised at the lies, the killing that went on even as both Kennedy and Johnson realized it was all a totally senseless waste.God help me for thinking this, but is Trump really worse than Kennedy and Johnson?Sorry for bleating on your shoulder.I was 9 years old when John Kennedy was elected, a born and raised Democrat and in Massachusetts, no less. I thought JFK was a man of destiny.

Constellation Brands reports strong 2nd quarter

Victor-based Constellation Brands is reporting earnings that topped Wall Street expectations. For its second quarter, the company saw profits of about $500 million, compared to $359 million a year ago. Earnings per share of $2.47 topped analysts' estimates. Revenues totaled just over $2 billion. President and CEO Rob Sands says the quarter shows Constellation's strategy is paying off.

Continental Tire touts $4M in local investment, other milestones

The groundbreaking ceremony for the Continental Tire plant in Hinds County. Almost one year after breaking ground on a its new Mississippi plant, Continental Tire says the company has surpassed several key milestones. A fact sheet the German manufacturer sent out shows that the company has started installing piling for the 5.2 million square-foot building, cleared 700 acres of land and moved 4 million cubic yards of dirt. Continental could make Mississippi a major player in global tire market

The earth work, which has sometimes continued throughout the night hours, at the Hinds County facility is now 95 percent complete, the company says. State and local government leaders kept negotiations to bring Continental secret for several years until just before the 2016 legislative session, when lawmakers pushed through an incentive package worth approximately $600 million.

Contrary to Trump’s assertions, reporters do not feel ‘able to write whatever they want to write’

Eric Black

The Los Angeles Times (among many other papers) reports that, during a media availability while meeting in the Oval Office with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, President Donald Trump said that "it is frankly disgusting the way the press is able to write whatever they want to write."The current incumbent must be brilliant in some way that I am unable to appreciate or am not used to describing as brilliant. After all, as he would gladly remind me if he knew I existed, he's president and I'm not. Point taken.In order to understand his brilliance better, I think I would need to know much more about several areas of psychology, mass psychology, individual psychology, and aberrant psychology. But, from my modest post as a scribbler I can relate to him only by noting what he does and says and tweets. (He says and tweets a lot more than he does.) And I do try to figure him out and occasionally cling to some crumb of hope that he's not as bad and dangerous as he often seems (at least to me).But from what he says and tweets and does, he seems to put himself in a poor position to render judgment about who does or doesn't write (or say) whatever they want to write (or say).Not meaning to brag (and certainly acknowledging that Trump knows more about several subjects than I do) I do have a lifetime's experience in the craft of journalism.

Convicted 23 years ago, Kansas prisoner’s case exposes deeply flawed justice

A Kansas City, Kansas man remains locked up for a 1994 double murder despite substantial evidence that he is innocent, and was convicted only because of a flawed justice system. This is the first of three reports. Lamonte McIntyre has been locked in a Kansas prison for 23 years, insisting he had nothing do with the murders of two men as they sat in a parked car in Kansas City, Kansas. His claim of innocence is scheduled for a hearing this week that is likely not only to undercut the evidence leading to his conviction, but also to pull back the curtain on a deeply flawed criminal justice system. Affidavits gathered by McIntyre's attorneys in advance of the hearing, as well as interviews conducted over the past four months by Injustice Watch, raise questions about every step of the legal process:
The police detective who developed the case was known in the community, and even among fellow officers, for sexual encounters with poor and vulnerable black women whom he used as informants.

Convoy of vintage military vehicles is traveling Route 66 to pay tribute to veterans

A convoy of 60 vintage military vehicles idled on the parking lot at Six Flags St. Louis in Eureka last Wednesday, ready to roll at sunrise. But first, the convoy paused for the National Anthem. These can-do jeeps, ambulances and trucks were parked here overnight, while the drivers slept at nearby hotels and campgrounds. The vehicles were built to transport soldiers and supplies during World War II, and the Korean and Vietnam wars.

Cook On: Chowder for the Wolf

Surprise bounty? Here's a plan.Cook On: Chowder for the Wolf was first posted on October 11, 2017 at 8:08 am.

Cooper vetoes bill eliminating 2018 judicial primary

Republicans likely have just enough votes to override governor's veto. No action from Senate on judicial redistricting plan as special session ends. The post Cooper vetoes bill eliminating 2018 judicial primary appeared first on Carolina Public Press.

Cops involved in domestic assault incidents rarely face sanctions in Minnesota

Brian Lambert

In the second part of the Star Tribune's series, “Shielded by the Badge,” Jennifer Bjorhus and Mary Jo Webster write, “A Star Tribune review of court documents and state licensing records found more than 500 sworn officers convicted of crimes since 1995. Nearly one in 10 of those convictions stemmed from a domestic altercation — at least 50 officers with crimes ranging from property damage to domestic assault. Just four of them lost their state law enforcement licenses. One officer disconnected his ex-wife's frantic 911 calls, declaring ‘I am 911.' Another put his hands around his girlfriend's neck in a fight …. Both kept their licenses and badges.”St.Peter has seen enough.

Cori Bush and Percy Green discuss 2 generations of St. Louis civil rights protests

Here in St. Louis, we're well into the second week of protests following the acquittal of Jason Stockley . It's a scene we've seen as recently in 2014, when protests erupted in response to the police shooting death of Michael Brown Jr. We're also in an era of mass protest , on many platforms, particularly about police shootings of African-American men and boys in the United States. The events have caused some people to draw comparisons to another era of mass protest in the United States: the 1960s. The height of the civil rights, the Vietnam War and women's rights movements, all drew mass protests into American streets, calling for change.

Cornyn: Bill with more Harvey aid for Texas coming in November

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Senate will not add more funds earmarked for Texas' recovery to a new disaster spending bill slated for a vote this week, the state's senior senator said on Thursday. U.S. Sen. John Cornyn told reporters on a conference call Thursday afternoon that he spoke with President Donald Trump and his budget director Mick Mulvaney and was assured that a separate spending aid bill would come soon. "It's coming in November, and it will be for Texans recovering from Harvey," Cornyn said. Few Texans were pleased with a $36.5 billion disaster relief legislation that passed the U.S. House last week, with some including Gov. Greg Abbott arguing the bill did not do enough for Texas. That is now the bill moving through the Senate chamber and will likely be up for a vote Thursday night or Friday morning.

Costs for Taxpayers Rise in Opioid Epidemic

If you think the opioid crisis has nothing to do with you, consider that the public already is paying for it and the price tag is growing, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports. Eleven counties across Ohio have levies on the November ballot to support the social service agencies that have become overwhelmed by the epidemic. County administrators expect more levies on ballots in the next few years. “Children services costs are exploding around the state,” said Brad Cole of the County Commissioners' Association of Ohio. “The avalanche of kids coming into the system [because of the opioid crisis] is out-stripping the funds that counties have.” With the increase in synthetic opioids, which are far deadlier than heroin alone, the crisis and its fallout is growing worse, causing more counties to go to voters for help.

Cotto Vows To Advocate For Parents

A one-time Board of Education candidate turned mayoral appointee is one step closer to having a seat on that board left vacant by the death of former Board President Daisy Gonzalez.

Could Bannon’s Prince disrupt Wyoming’s GOP?

A former chairman of the Wyoming Republican Party said Erik Prince and his anti-establishment backer, Steve Bannon, don't understand Wyoming, and their entry into a senate race could damage political discourse here. “Sell chaos theory somewhere else,” Matt Micheli wrote in emailed comments to WyoFile last week. “Leave Wyoming out of those ugly agendas.”
Micheli was referring to inter-party political battles in which Bannon, the former White House chief strategist and chairman of conservative media outlet Breitbart, has publicly announced he seeks to back candidates against U.S. Senate leadership and establishment lawmakers. Among the most prominent targets in national media of late is Sen. John Barrasso, who is up for reelection next year. Erik Prince, a political novice and former Navy SEAL who made a fortune in contracting security services to the U.S. Military, said in an interview with Breitbart that he will announce in the coming weeks whether he will challenge Barrasso in the Republican primary.

Could Bannon’s Prince disrupt Wyoming’s GOP?

A former chairman of the Wyoming Republican Party said Erik Prince and his anti-establishment backer, Steve Bannon, don't understand Wyoming, and their entry into a senate race could damage political discourse here. “Sell chaos theory somewhere else,” Matt Micheli wrote in emailed comments to WyoFile last week. “Leave Wyoming out of those ugly agendas.”
Micheli was referring to inter-party political battles in which Bannon, the former White House chief strategist and chairman of conservative media outlet Breitbart, has publicly announced he seeks to back candidates against U.S. Senate leadership and establishment lawmakers. Among the most prominent targets in national media of late is Sen. John Barrasso, who is up for reelection next year. Erik Prince, a political novice and former Navy SEAL who made a fortune in contracting security services to the U.S. Military, said in an interview with Breitbart that he will announce in the coming weeks whether he will challenge Barrasso in the Republican primary.

Could fungi provide an alternative to palm oil?

Fungi – a kingdom grouping that includes mushrooms, mold and yeast – have long been heralded for their beneficial properties. They've been used to soak up oil spills, boost your immune system and lower cholesterol, among other environmental and medical feats. Now, researchers have found one more use for fungi – as a possible alternative to palm oil. The palm oil industry has a history of association with deforestation and human rights abuses. But palm oil is also one of the most versatile products on the market, found in everything from margarine and ice cream to cosmetics and certain fabrics.

Could Mississippi lose seat on 5th Circuit Court of Appeals?

President Donald Trump's recent judicial nominees have Mississippi jurists and politicos worried the seat held by Judge Grady Jolly of Mississippi will be filled by a judge from another state, The Clarion-Ledger reported. Read the story here. The post Could Mississippi lose seat on 5th Circuit Court of Appeals? appeared first on Mississippi Today.

Council Approves $61.8M Redevelopment of Eastside’s Red Berry Estate

The City purchased the 84-acre property at 856 Gambler Rd. for nearly $2.3 million in 2012 and is providing incentives to the developers. The post Council Approves $61.8M Redevelopment of Eastside's Red Berry Estate appeared first on Rivard Report.

Council Approves $68.8M Redevelopment of Eastside’s Red Berry Estate

The City purchased the 84-acre property at 856 Gambler Rd. for nearly $2.3 million in 2012 and is providing incentives to the developers. The post Council Approves $68.8M Redevelopment of Eastside's Red Berry Estate appeared first on Rivard Report.

Council Members Push DV Awareness … Al Smith Dinner Tonight: Schedules for Oct. 19

Approximately 8AM – 9AM — Citywide Domestic Violence Awareness Outreach by Council offices:
Office of Council Member Laurie A. Cumbo & OCDV Commissioner Cecile Noel: Franklin Avenue (2/3/4/5) stop, BrooklynOffice of Council Member Helen Rosenthal: 72nd Street (1,2,3) stop, Manhattan
Office of Council Member Melissa Mark-Viverito: 116th Street and Lexington Avenue (6) stop, Manhattan
Office of Council Member Vanessa L. Gibson: 161st St. – Yankee Stadium (B/D/4) stop, Bronx
Office of Council Member Ritchie Torres: Fordham (D) stop: 189th St. & Grand Concourse; Allerton & Fordham Plaza (2/5) stop, Bronx
Office of Council Member Andy King: Gun Hill Rd. (2/5) stop, Bronx
Office of Council Member Annabel Palma: Parkchester and East 177th Street (6) stop, Bronx
Office of Council Member Jumaane D. Williams: Flatbush and Nostrand aves. (2/5) stop, Brooklyn
Office of Council Member Rafael Espinal: Myrtle-Wyckoff avenues (L/M) stop, Brooklyn
Office of Council Member Inez Barron: Pennsylvania Ave.

Councilman Pelaez Wants Enhanced Emergency Alerts

Councilman Manny Pelaez (D8) is researching ways to enhance the City's Alert SA text notification system. The post Councilman Pelaez Wants Enhanced Emergency Alerts appeared first on Rivard Report.

Councilwoman Gonzales: Bond, Budget Can Boost Quality of Life in District 5

District 5 must better address issues such as affordable housing, reliable transportation, and higher paying jobs, Councilwoman Shirley Gonzales said. The post Councilwoman Gonzales: Bond, Budget Can Boost Quality of Life in District 5 appeared first on Rivard Report.

County amateur radio operators prepare for emergencies

Amateur Radio operators prepare for disaster communication during simulate test

County Assigns Meals Tax Funding to Green Square Project

Wake County is holding up its end of the funding bargain for the Green Square project, agreeing Monday to pay out $2 million during the next several years. Green Square is being built on Jones Street between McDowell and Salisbury streets. The project includes an expansion of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, with a connecting bridge to the current facility. The building also provides office space for 640 Department of Environmental and Natural Resources employees, and an underground parking deck with 426 parking spaces and a new State Employees Credit Union headquarters with connecting bridge. Developers aim to position the project for a minimum of LEED Gold certification.

County Bolsters Website Funds, Gives Contingent Support To Monument Plan

Bexar County Commissioners on Tuesday advanced two initiatives aimed at showcasing the formative events that shaped San Antonio's early history. The post County Bolsters Website Funds, Gives Contingent Support To Monument Plan appeared first on Rivard Report.

County council calls for investigation into police conduct during Galleria protest

Some members of the St. Louis County Council want an outside agency to investigate how police handled protests on Saturday at the Saint Louis Galleria mall. That was the conclusion after hearing the concerns of nearly 30 speakers at Tuesday's council meeting. It comes as protests continued on Tuesday over Jason Stockley's acquittal of first-degree murder charges in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith.

County Fair Winner John Bergman Shares His Passion for Home Brewing

With the fair just over, participants in the Homemade Beer and Wine category share the joy of creating one's own product, while encouraging others to enter next year.

County Puts Up Port-a-Potty Next to Actual Public Restroom at Waterfront Park

San Diego still is having trouble with one of the oldest problems of life itself: the need to urinate and defecate every day. Perhaps nowhere is the awkwardness of our acknowledgement of this most human of needs more apparent than at the County Administration Center on Pacific Highway. There, the resplendent Waterfront Park has operated for three years after parking lots were exchanged for fountains, a large playground, native gardens and large grassy areas. And now a port-a-potty. Photo by Adriana HeldizPortable toilets have been placed in front of the County Administration Building in downtown San Diego.

County Supervisor News Roundup

Chamber produces promotional videos for county, White House designates county HIDTA area, new LBGT youth program, county to produce its own promotional video.

County to Try Tickets Instead of Jail for Marijuana Misdemeanors

Bexar County will implement of a Cite and Release program, which will allow police officers to issue citations for certain non-violent misdemeanors. The post County to Try Tickets Instead of Jail for Marijuana Misdemeanors appeared first on Rivard Report.

County Won’t Share Many Details on Where Hepatitis A Cases and Deaths Are Happening

As a deadly hepatitis A outbreak booms, county public health officials aren't sharing detailed location data on cases or deaths with the public – or with cities scrambling to help stem the health crisis. It's meant cities including San Diego, El Cajon and Chula Vista are basing increased sanitation efforts on public complaints and areas where their homeless populations cluster rather than on detailed data and that the public has little information on where the virus is spreading. Maps released by the county show hepatitis A has spread most dramatically in downtown San Diego and El Cajon and appears to have clustered in other central city neighborhoods. Map courtesy of San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency

The county hasn't released more specific data on where the more than 480 patients who've contracted hepatitis A were living when they were diagnosed. County officials blame state and federal health privacy laws and challenges tracking the homeless and illicit drug-using populations hit hardest by the virus for their limited data-sharing.

Court filing: Trump appointee blocks pregnant teen migrant from getting abortion

A Trump appointee has prevented a 17-year-old migrant at a federally funded shelter in Texas from getting an abortion and directed she be sent instead to religious counseling, according to a motion filed in federal court last week. Lawyers with the ACLU of Northern California will argue on her behalf at an emergency court hearing in San Francisco Wednesday. In court filings over the last few days, they've argued that changes at the Office of Refugee Resettlement under President Donald Trump's administration are to blame and that the girl, referred to as Jane Doe, is not an isolated case. According to emails filed with the court, new ORR Director Scott Lloyd has met with a minor in federal custody to discuss her pregnancy and directed his staff to counsel girls about the risks of abortion – an early sign of how Lloyd's priorities will reflect his past work in pro-life advocacy. In a declaration filed with the court, Doe explained that she decided to get an abortion and made appointments at a clinic, but was never allowed to go.

Court Making Tough Call on Health Insurance

The Supreme Court could wipe away health insurance for millions of Americans when it resolves the latest fight over President Barack Obama's health overhaul. But would the court take away a benefit from so many people? Should the justices even consider such consequences?

Court of Criminal Appeals stays ruling that voided Paxton prosecutor pay

Texas' highest criminal court has stepped into the long-running dispute over the prosecutors' pay in the securities fraud case against Attorney General Ken Paxton, putting on hold a lower-court ruling that voided a six-figure invoice. In a decision Monday, the Court of Criminal Appeals issued a stay of an Aug. 21 ruling by the Dallas-based 5th Court of Appeals that had invalidated the $205,000 payment, which covered work going back to January 2016. Last week, the prosecutors asked the Court of Criminal Appeals to reverse that ruling, calling it a "clear abuse of discretion." In its order Monday, the Court of Criminal Appeals gave all sides 30 days to respond to the prosecutors' arguments.

Court to hear school funding case amid discord over education aid

The Connecticut Supreme Court will hear arguments today in a once-in-a-generation lawsuit that could pave the way for major changes in how the state funds its public schools. Meanwhile, across the street, legislators and the governor are little closer to fixing the problems that prompted a scathing lower-court ruling more than a year ago.

Court weighs whether doubled cost for pipeline merits new review

The Vermont Gas Systems headquarters in South Burlington. Photo by Erin Mansfield/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Vermont Gas" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?resize=150%2C100&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Vermont-Gas-office-em-1.jpg?w=1024&ssl=1 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">The Vermont Gas Systems headquarters in South Burlington. Photo by Erin Mansfield/VTDiggerA doubled cost is not a substantial change — at least not in the context of state approval for utility projects, Vermont Gas argued before the Vermont Supreme Court on Wednesday. The natural gas company appeared before the court to defend against Conservation Law Foundation's attempts to re-litigate the pipeline's 2013 Certificate of Public Good. In issuing the permit, regulators found the pipeline would promote the general good of the Vermont public.

Coverage gap now unavoidable for customers of Mission and Blue Cross

Customers with WNC's biggest health provider will be out of network for Blue Cross coverage for some time after Oct. 5, even if the parties reach a deal. The post Coverage gap now unavoidable for customers of Mission and Blue Cross appeared first on Carolina Public Press.

Covered Wagon Camping at the State Fair

Over $3000 in premiums
Cashmere goats
Over 1600 entries
It was the Iowa State Fair of 1860 — the seventh ever held. The state was young — only 14 years old. The American Civil War had not yet started in 1860. The capital had only recently been moved to Des Moines from Iowa City. The population of the state was not quite 700,000.

CPA Mutual Insurance is first captive insurance company to invest in affordable housing tax credits

News Release — Champlain Housing Trust
October 3, 2017
Contact: Chris Donnelly
Director of Community Relations
Champlain Housing Trust
(802) 862-6244
Legislative change went in effect in July that allows Captives to help Vermonters obtain an affordable home
Burlington, Vermont – CPA Mutual Insurance Company of America Risk Retention Group has been the first captive insurance company to take advantage of an expansion of eligible investors in the State of Vermont's Affordable Housing Tax Credit program. The company has purchased $133,334 worth of credits from the Champlain Housing Trust, which will use the proceeds to create permanently affordable homes in Essex. The State's program was expanded by the Legislature in the past session and allowed the participation of captive insurance companies beginning in July. CPA Mutual's captive management company, Strategic Risk Solutions (SRS), worked with the Vermont Captive Insurance Association and the Vermont Department of Financial Regulation to bringing this initiative to the legislature during the last session. The purchase of the tax credits will provide a reduction in state tax liability spread out over the next five years, while providing a lump sum up front for CHT to subsidize four condominiums for sale in its signature shared equity program.

CPS Energy, EPIcenter Detail Plans for Renovation Projects

New details emerged Monday about CPS Energy's plans for the one-story 6,800-square-foot building and EPIcenter's ambitious fundraising campaign. The post CPS Energy, EPIcenter Detail Plans for Renovation Projects appeared first on Rivard Report.

Crime Stats Briefing, Vigil Against Gun Violence: Schedule for Oct. 3

11:00 AM – Mayor de Blasio and Police Commissioner O'Neill meet with the press to discuss crime statistics. Police Service Area 4, 130 Avenue C, Manhattan. 2:00 PM — Governor Cuomo Makes an Announcement. 633 3rd Avenue, 38th Floor, Manhattan. 2:15 PM – Mayor de Blasio greets campaign staff at GOTV training.

Criminal Justice, From The Inside Out

Babz Rawls-Ivy is the editor of the Inner-City News, the host of daily WNHH FM's “LoveBabz LoveTalk,” and a frequent guest on WNHH shows. Jeff Grant is the executive director of Family ReEntry, a social service organization in Bridgeport working with people who have gotten out of prison, and helping to prevent them from going back in.They've both also served prison sentences themselves. They are now co-hosts of a new show on WNHH, “Criminal Justice Insider,” that tackles criminal justice issues from the inside out.

Criminals Are Killing More Witnesses Against Them

Henry Nunn of Indianapolis paid the ultimate price for testifying in court. Nunn, 63, was killed in his home after identifying one of the men who killed his neighbor in 2012. The neighbor had been a police informant in a drug investigation. Nunn's death is an example of what Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry calls a “significant problem” confronting the criminal justice system in Indianapolis and other cities. The drug trade is fueling a surge in killings, and street gangs are silencing those unlucky enough to see who pulled the trigger, reports the Indianapolis Star.

Critic: Proposed Financial Policies ‘Pointless’

Critic: Proposed Financial Policies ‘Pointless'
Commissioners Court will vote tomorrow,on Central Health financial policies for FY 18
by Ken Martin© The Austin Bulldog 2017Part 3 in a SeriesPosted October 9, 2017 1:14pm
The Travis County Commissioners Court is scheduled to vote tomorrow on financial policies that Central Health must follow in FY 2018, which began October 1. County Judge Sarah Eckhardt had been adamant at the September 19 meeting that she wanted a vote October 3, saying, “A perpetual conversation is not healthy.” At the October 3 meeting, however, she said, “Although last time I said I would take a vote today, I'm going back on that because we're received so much new information and we're drafting.”
The new information to which she referred were two new drafts prepared by Assistant County Attorney John Hille. He handed the drafts to the commissioners just as they took up the matter of Central Health's financial policies at 1:45pm—nearly four hours after the scheduled time of 10am. Another piece of new information was an October 2 letter to the judge and others from Patricia C. “Patti” Ohlendorf, vice president of legal affairs for the University of Texas at Austin. Ohlendorf, who attended the October 3 meeting of the Commissioners Court, seeks to preserve the $35 million a year the university gets for Dell Medical School through the Affiliation Agreement it has with Central Health and the Community Care Collaborative.

Critics Question Chicago’s Strategy Against Guns

Amid Chicago's ongoing epidemic of gun violence, with 494 fatal shootings and 2,866 people shot this year through September, the availability of guns has been blamed as a root cause and become a defining public safety issue. Chicago police say they've seized nearly 7,000 illegal firearms this year, and federal authorities have stepped up efforts to take down dealers, the Chicago Sun-Times reports. Most of the guns police seize come from Indiana and other states where firearms laws are more lax, police and researchers have found. After they were purchased legally, most were sold, loaned or stolen. Typically, individuals or small groups are involved in the dealing, not organized trafficking rings, experts say.

Crop Shop

Students sell garden yieldCrop Shop was first posted on October 16, 2017 at 7:18 am.

Crosswalk Appears on St. Mary’s Strip, Prompting Swift Action from City

A pedestrian crosswalk appeared Friday morning at the intersection of North St. Mary's and East Mistletoe, placed there by an anonymous group. The post Crosswalk Appears on St. Mary's Strip, Prompting Swift Action from City appeared first on Rivard Report.

Crude oil by rail or pipeline? New studies explore the question

Recent years have seen massive standoffs over oil pipeline construction and smaller but persistent protests against the transport of oil by train, or what opponents call “bomb trains.”
Protesters often highlight the catastrophic risks if pipelines rupture near aquifers or sacred lands, or if trains derail in cities. And many argue that oil should not be extracted at all, especially through fracking tight shale deposits or mining viscous tar sands. But if one assumes oil will be extracted and refined for the foreseeable future, two new studies offer insight into the economics, health impacts and risks of pipelines versus crude oil by rail, or CBR. Transporting oil by rail is often viewed as a stopgap measure until more pipelines are built. But in a paper published this month, public policy professor Ryan Kellogg and business professor Thomas Covert at the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago found that CBR actually plays a crucial role in the oil economy, similar to the role that peaker plants play in our country's electric system. That is, CBR is a flexible way to get oil to and from different locations on relatively short notice, responding to market demands.

Cruz presses Sessions on Trump administration’s “catch-and-release” policy

Amid a heavy backlog in immigration courts in Texas and California, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday said the federal government was considering ways to reduce the number of undocumented immigrants who are granted hearings before immigration judges before being deported. While a legislative solution is preferred, he added, his agency was investigating what it could do absent Congressional action. The comments were made during a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing where U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, pressed Sessions on whether the federal government was still operating under an Obama-era, "catch-and-release" policy where undocumented immigrants are not immediately deported. “That is highly troubling. When I heard those reports in January and February, I told [U.S. Border Patrol agents] ‘Give the administration some time to get their team in place.'

Cryptocurrency profiteer to pay millions in wire fraud settlement

Josh Garza
" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?fit=300%2C208&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?fit=610%2C422&ssl=1" src="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?resize=610%2C422&ssl=1" alt="Josh Garza" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?resize=610%2C422&ssl=1 610w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?resize=125%2C87&ssl=1 125w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?resize=300%2C208&ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?resize=150%2C104&ssl=1 150w, https://i1.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/JoshGarza.jpg?w=640&ssl=1 640w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Homero Joshua Garza(This story by Bob Audette was published in the Brattleboro Reformer on Oct. 6, 2017.)
BOSTON — A former Brattleboro businessman has agreed to discontinue any illegal activity related to his sales of crytpocurrency and to give up $9,182,000 in profits from his illegal or wrongful conduct, including an additional $742,774 in interest. In July, Homero Joshua Garza pleaded guilty to wire fraud in a criminal case filed against him in federal court by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Garza told customers he operated a number of bitcoin mining operations — Gaw Miners, Zenminer and Zen Cloud — and that investment in the company would reap financial rewards. Garza, who founded the now-defunct Optima Computers in Brattleboro in 2002, went on to found the virtual currency companies and used them to defraud investors, according to a statement issued in July by the United States Attorney District of Connecticut.

CT closed last budget in the red — for the third straight year

Though state government has gone 102 days into the new fiscal year without a budget, the outgoing year's finances weren't trouble-free. Connecticut closed the 2016-17 fiscal year with a $22.7 million deficit, its third consecutive year in the red.

CT Dems say Trump ‘sabotaged’ ACA, ensuring rise in premiums

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Friday he will end payments reimbursing insurers for lowering out-of-pocket costs for the poorest Americans, provoking cries of Affordable Care Act “sabotage” from Democrats and ensuring health insurance rates will rise for many Americans next year.

CT Guard joins Pentagon ramp up in Puerto Rico

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon beefed up its presence in storm-ravaged Puerto Rico Thursday and shifted its mission from search and rescue to relief – providing vital supplies of food and water. But a Connecticut lawmaker says that's not enough and wants as many as 50,000 troops sent to the island.

CT lawmakers blast Trump move on employer birth-control mandate

WASHINGTON — To Connecticut's Democratic lawmakers, President Donald Trump's decision to roll back the Affordable Care Act's mandate that businesses include birth control benefits in the health care policies that cover their workers amounted to fighting words. “I'm sick and tired of Republicans trying to take away women's health care,” said Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn.

CT lawmakers give Weinstein donations to charities that help women

WASHINGTON – Disgraced film producer Harvey Weinstein has been a generous contributor to political campaigns, giving largely to Democratic candidates, including several in Connecticut. Those politicians are now giving that money to charities that help abused women.

CT lawmakers hail deal to fix Obamacare, but Congress’ approval not assured

WASHINGTON – A rare bipartisan deal has been reached on one of the most contentious issues in Congress, the Affordable Care Act. It includes restoration of key payments to insurance companies that President Donald Trump cut off last week. Connecticut's Democratic lawmakers hailed the agreement, but it may run into trouble from conservative Republicans who don't want to shore up Obamacare.

CT lawmakers keep introducing gun control bills, but face uphill climb

WASHINGTON — Rep. Elizabeth Esty, who represents Newtown in Congress, on Thursday was the latest lawmaker to introduce a bill aimed at curbing gun deaths. Although the number of bills in Congress that would tighten regulations on firearms is growing, there's no indication the political climate on Capitol HIll is becoming more favorable to gun control, even after the Las Vegas massacre.

CT lawmakers lead new gun control push in wake of Las Vegas massacre

WASHINGTON -- Reacting to the horror of the mass slaying in Las Vegas late Sunday, and led by Connecticut's lawmakers, there's a new push in Congress to reintroduce gun control bills that failed in the past. Though the fate of those bills in uncertain, "there's a sense that enough is enough," said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.

CT planning for influx of Maria refugees but how many is unclear

Connecticut officials have begun planning for an influx of Puerto Ricans seeking refuge from the devastation of Hurricane Maria, but say it will be weeks or months before it becomes clear how many may come to Connecticut – temporarily or permanently.

CT school population shrinking at faster rate than in 48 states

An anticipated 14.2 percent decline means an estimated 77,600 fewer students will be attending Connecticut's public schools by 2025, and about 2,100 fewer students will be graduating high school each year, the U.S. Department of Education said.

CT Supreme Court grapples with its role addressing poverty in the classroom

The Connecticut Supreme Court Thursday grappled with the question of the state's responsibility for overcoming the ill effects of poverty as a coalition of parents, educators and local officials argued the state should be required to spend more in its lowest-performing school districts.

Cuban art exhibit at Saint Michael’s – El Yuma

News Release — Saint Michael's College
October 3, 2017
Contact:
Mark Tarnacki
802.654.2795mtarnacki@smcvt.edu
Thursday, October 19
Saint Michael's College presents an exhibition, “El Yuma” — Contemporary Cuban Art in the McCarthy Arts Center Art Gallery, open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., from October 19 through December 15.Curated by Sachie Hernandez and A.D. Guerra. This is an exhibition by contemporary Cuban artists examining images, histories and fantasies about the United States. “El Yuma” is a term used in Cuba to describe foreigners, especially Americans, and sometimes it refers to the United States itself. Curator Sachie Hernandez will speak about the exhibition from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Cheray Science Hall 101. An opening reception for the exhibit will follow in the Gallery at 5 p.m.
Expanded information from Brian Collier:
El Yuma is an exhibition of work by contemporary Cuban artists examining images, histories and fantasies about the United States.

Culture Report: Barrio Logan Artists Booted From Yet Another Venue

For years, Union Barrio Logan has offered studio and workshop space to more than 30 artists and creative entrepreneurs. But now all the tenants have to be out by the end of the month. The closure comes just weeks after the city shut down The Glashaus due to code violations and safety concerns. Alternative arts venues across the country are being scrutinized by fire and city officials after the deadly Ghost Ship fire in Oakland last year took the lives of 36 people. At the Union Barrio Logan, though, the property owners pre-emptively shut the space down before the unpermitted construction inside the building made it onto city officials' radars.

Culture Report: Connecting Art and Science at the Natural History Museum

Artist Lisa Jetonne was given free rein to explore the San Diego Natural History Museum‘s five floors of exhibitions and vast behind-the-scenes collections. Her mission: Come up with art projects that help create connections between visitors and the museum's scientific research, collections and history. Jetonne is the first artist in residence at The Nat. She started in September and will be working in the museum through mid-December. Folks can find her in the museum working on the first of four participatory art projects that invite visitors to help create art for the museum's collection.

Culture Report: La Jolla Playhouse Brings Unconventional Art to the Urban Core

Taking theater and art outside traditional venues isn't easy. The payoff for audiences that see the experimental work can be huge, though, and folks can walk away experiencing something they've never experienced before. La Jolla Playhouse's Without Walls Festival, its biennial event featuring immersive, site-specific and eclectic theater, is back this year with dozens of avant-garde performances at interesting venues around downtown Oct. 19-22. Several pieces are being staged inside Bread & Salt, a former bread factory turned arts venue in Logan Heights.

Culture Report: The Padres Are Done, But a Tradition Lives on

As another season comes to a close for a cellar-dwelling ball club, fans have little to cling to. Sure, the Padres have a young corps. But until it reaches its potential, there isn't a lot to root for, or a lot to enjoy during the depressing fall months. The respite is regaling friends with stories of Tony Gwynn, or basking in the memories of former greatness and age-old traditions of the grand old game. One of these traditions was the appearance of a live organ player underscoring the highs and lows of the game.

Culture with a Card

Butterfield offers streaming serviceCulture with a Card was first posted on September 27, 2017 at 7:26 am.

Cunningham, Storch win key legislative contests

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 5, 2008 - State Rep. Jane Cunningham beat Gina Loudon for the Republican nomination for state senate in the 7th district - the seat held by Loudon's husband John. The margin was 46 percent to 38 percent. Neal St. Onge finished third.

Curious Louis: Uncovering what remains of St. Louis’ slave trading past

Before the Civil War, Bernard Lynch owned the largest slave market in St. Louis. His operation included an office at 104 Locust Street, and a holding pen for slaves at 5 th and Myrtle, present-day Broadway and Clark. After the war, Lynch's slave pen became a storage building for the Meyer Brothers Drug company, and in 1963, it was demolished to build the new Busch Stadium. Listener Anne Walker wrote to Curious Louis wondering whether any artifacts from the pen remained.

Customers bid farewell to Lubeley’s Bakery, which is closing after 80 years

Customers have been lining up before sunrise all this week at Lubeley's Bakery and Deli in south St. Louis County for one last chance to buy their favorite strudels and stollens and split-layer cakes. The bakery will close on Saturday, after 80 years of business in the St. Louis area. Helen Lubeley Murray said she and her brother Bob — who took over the bakery from their parents four decades ago — are going to hang up their aprons and retire.

Cut & Paste: Documentary follows St. Louis teen haunted by death, inspired by new life

By the time Deja Shelton of St. Louis was 17, she'd already lost lots of friends to gun violence. One was shot while waiting at a bus stop, another while walking to the store. Shelton had few outlets for expressing her grief and coping with emotions about that trauma. In her world, fighting, not talking, was a typical way to address conflict.

CVOEO announces the Crystal Family New Hope Award

News Release — CVOEO
Oct. 20, 2017
Contact:
Joan White, joanwhite@cvoeo.org; 862-2771 ext. 744
Burlington, VT. – The Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity (CVOEO) is excited to announce the establishment of a new annual award for members of the New American community: The Crystal Family New Hope Award. In this inaugural year, there will be two awards of $500 granted to Fardowsa Ibrahim and Abdelali Amrani.

CWOS Takes A Slice Of Memory Out Of A Barn

A spiral installed outside the Eli Whitney Barn on Whitney Avenue invited visitors who had come for City Wide Open Studios to linger, and linger — and make connections between art, science, and the natural world that they might not soon forget.

D, B & Q Drive Into History

The D bus has not run late all week and never will again.The 212 bus? That could be a different story.

D.C. Police Body Cams Had Little Impact, Study Finds

Washington, D.C., police officers wearing body cameras reported using force about as often as colleagues who didn't have them, and citizen complaints against the two groups were about even, says a new study that bucks early expectations about the devices' impact, the Washington Post reports. When the cameras started to appear in police departments in 2014, experts predicted behavior on both sides of the badge would improve. The study by D.C.'s in-house research branch suggests otherwise. Police Chief Peter Newsham said the results surprised department leaders and were “not what we anticipated.” He said it appears in many police interactions, “cameras didn't make a difference.”
The chief said the recordings have been valuable, providing a precise record of tense and difficult encounters, including police shootings. The District says the study of its $5.1 million program is among the more comprehensive looks at whether police-worn cameras affect behavior by officers and the people they encounter.

D.C. Republicans’ big tax overhaul hinges on killing one of Minnesota’s favorite deductions

Sam Brodey

The Republican Party's message on their plan to overhaul the U.S. tax code has been straightforward: they are aiming to make taxes lower and simpler to file.Last week, GOP leaders released a long-awaited “framework” illustrating how they would accomplish that goal. It's the clearest statement yet of the party's priorities as it attempts to make the biggest changes to the tax code in 30 years; much of what's in it is likely to appear in whatever legislation they introduce in the coming weeks.As Republicans make the case for their plan, there has been scarcely any talk of whose taxes might go up as a result of the plan. But one important element of the tax framework, if enacted, could increase tax bills significantly for some U.S. taxpayers.The GOP plan proposes eliminating the state and local tax deduction, or SALT deduction, which lets tax filers deduct the taxes they pay to state and local governments from their total taxable income. For people who live in places with high income or property taxes, it's a deduction that can save thousands of dollars a year, and it's one of the most popular deductions in the entire U.S. tax code.The SALT deduction has long been in the GOP's crosshairs: they say eliminating it would only affect a small group of people — primarily in high-tax blue states, no less — while helping pay for significant tax cuts elsewhere. To hear others tell it, the SALT deduction saves families money and boosts the ability of state and local governments to provide services.Minnesota is well above-average in the number of residents who claim some SALT deduction — roughly a third of tax filers in Minnesota do.

DACA is still an issue. Here are three questions students are asking in Memphis.

The Trump administration's wind-down of protections for undocumented immigrants isn't always the lead story of daily newscasts, but it's still very much in the minds of the nation's students. Chalkbeat sat in recently as students at Memphis Central High School took on the issue in a free-wheeling conversation aimed at talking about tough topics in person — not just throwing darts on social media. The gathering, called Courageous Conversation, meets several times a month to let high schoolers discuss whatever is on their minds. The afterschool club started four years ago through Facing History and Ourselves, a nonprofit group that trains students and teachers with diverse backgrounds about leadership and civic engagement. Here's what students were asking about the planned end to the federal program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

DACA recipients in St. Louis area worry while Trump and Congress decide their futures

Eddie Albarran recalls being nervous — but also very determined — as he waited to address about 60 people gathered outside the St. Louis office of U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill last month. Albarran, who grew up in St. Louis, was about to acknowledge publicly a fact of his life that he usually keeps to himself: He is one of nearly 700,000 young immigrants who have temporary protection from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The Obama administration created the DACA policy in 2012 for children who were brought to the United States illegally by their parents.

Dallas Fed CEO: Technology, not trade or immigration, is main reason for job loss

SAN ANTONIO — If policymakers and elected officials keep buying into the misnomer that trade and immigration are the keys to job loss, the state's and country's leaders are going to craft policies that hinder growth and prosperity, the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas told business leaders in San Antonio. “A lot of these job dislocations are being publicly blamed on trade and immigration. Our analysis at the Dallas Fed is 15 years ago, maybe. Today, no,” Robert Kaplan told members of the Texas Business Leadership Council. “More likely, if your job is being disrupted it's because of technology.”
Kaplan said instead business and education leaders should look at the issues of unemployment and education through an apolitical lens if they don't want to risk Texas and the rest of the country becoming less competitive.

Daniella Zalcman Examines Identity During American University Visit

Sunday, October 22, 2017 - 4:00PM to 5:30PMWashington, DCUnited StatesDaniella ZalcmanPulitzer Center grantee and award-winning documentary photographer Daniella Zalcman will speak on her recent reporting covering the assimilation of indigenous youth in Canada and the persecuted LGBT community in Uganda.

Data Dig: Syringe exchanges play key role in limiting opiate deaths

Safe Recovery Executive Director Grace Keller in the room where used needles are processed for disposal. Photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1" alt="Grace Keller" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?resize=768%2C513&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/GraceKeller2.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Safe Recovery Executive Director Grace Keller in the room where used needles are processed for disposal. Photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDiggerBURLINGTON — Necessity is the mother of invention, and syringe exchange programs sprang up decades ago to address necessities born from the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Now that epidemic is fading, and leaders of some syringe exchange programs fear they may be orphaned just when they're needed to fight today's public health crisis of opiate addiction. Vermont officials say they are doing what they can for the exchanges, having increased state funding in recent years.

Data Drop: Misdemeanor Arrests in New York City, 2013-2017

Mayoral Photography OfficeFormer NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton, a pioneer of 'broken windows' policing, and Mayor de Blasio, one of the strategy's stoutest defenders. While Mayor de Blasio has achieved success, faced opposition and registered failures and on many issues during his first term, none played so large a role in his becoming mayor—or posed greater political risks through his tenure so far—as criminal justice. Read our article about his criminal justice record here, and see our timeline of events here. The data below is compiled by City Limits from data provided by the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services. The 2017 data is through August so to make it comparable, we have provided six-month totals for March through August for each year.

Data Drop: Some NYC Neighborhoods Have Less Representation at the Ballot Box

JleonJackson Heights' Council district has a small number of voters relative to its population. The concept of “one person, one vote” has never been meant literally. An age limit has always been in effect, though it was lowered in 1971. In many states, being incarcerated or just convicted of a crime can push a person off the roles temporarily of for life. And obviously, people who don't register or aren't citizens aren't part of that theoretical one-for-one equation.

Data Drop: Which is the Bluest Borough?

New York City is a Democratic town, but devotion to the donkeys—or to the two-party system—is far from uniform. The chart and pretty pictures below make this clear. The Bronx is the bluest borough, in terms of proportion: Dems made up 78 percent of active registered voters there in an April 2017 count by the New York State Board of Elections. Brooklyn was next with 71 percent Democratic registration. But in terms of raw numbers, Brooklyn showed the most blue.

David Flemming: Misjudging the impact of a $15 minimum wage

Editor's note: This commentary is by David Flemming, a policy analyst at the Ethan Allen Institute. Recently, Raise the Wage Coalition member Nathan Suter wrote a commentary entitled “Economic Evidence Points to Broad Benefits of a $15 Minimum Wage.” The commentary makes several dubious claims in support of Vermont raising the minimum wage to $15/hour. To make his case, Suter relies on four Berkeley studies, one of which was subjected to political interference by the pro-minimum wage Seattle mayor, and four Economic Policy Institute studies (EPI received 27 percent of its funding from labor unions, which often peg their contracts to a minimum wage baseline). If Vermont's experience with a $15 minimum wage is anything like Seattle's experience, workers are in for a rude surprise. The University of Washington discovered that Seattle businesses adapted to an increase in the minimum wave to $13 minimum wage by reducing the hours for workers in low-wage jobs ($13-$19/hour) by about 9 percent.

Days from execution, man convicted in prison guard’s murder insists on innocence

A man convicted in the 1999 murder of a Texas prison guard faces execution Thursday for the sixth time in a case where DNA testing has taken center stage. Robert Pruett was sentenced to death in the stabbing of Daniel Nagle, a 37-year-old guard at a prison in Beeville. Pruett was a 20-year-old inmate serving a 99-year sentence at the time for being an accomplice in a murder committed by his father when he was 15. Nagle was found lying in a pool of blood, stabbed repeatedly with a makeshift knife next to a torn up disciplinary report he had written on Pruett, according to court records. The prosecution argued that Pruett killed Nagle in retaliation for the report, and the jury agreed, but Pruett has consistently denied his involvement in the crime.

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Kingsman 2 The Golden Circle 2017 Online Full

De Blasio Rides the Bus, Then Talks About it: Schedules for Oct. 20

10:00 AM – Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina isits new PS 452 building, 210 W 61 Street, Manhattan. 10:15 AM – Mayor de Blasio appears on Buzzfeed's AM2DM
Approximately 11:30 AM – De Blasio rides the Westbound M23 Select Bus Service beginning at 9th Avenue & West 23rd Street and, at 11:45 a.m., delivers remarks about improving bus service at West Side Highway between 23rd & 22nd Streets, Manhattan.

De Blasio speaks with anxious parents in wake of school killing

Less than a week after a stabbing in a Bronx school left one student dead and another seriously injured, parents grilled Mayor Bill de Blasio at a public forum on his safety policies and what he is doing to control violence in their schools. One by one, parents at a Harlem forum on Monday stood to question the mayor and schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña: Would the city deploy more school psychologists? How can parents get better information on the safety of their schools? What happens if the police department's school safety agents are not effective in patrolling a school? The meeting, which was sometimes tense, was the first time the pair publicly heard from parents in the aftermath of the first student killing inside a school building in nearly 25 years.

De Blasio Surrogates Hit the Streets as Malliotakis Targets El Barrio: Official Schedules for Oct. 18

10:00 AM — The Committee on Finance holds a hearing on several items. Committee Room, City Hall, Manhattan. Live video here. 10:30 AM — Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis, the Republican nominee for mayor, holds a news conference to discuss “issues that affect El Barrio and the community's support of … her race for mayor.” Fiorello LaGuardia's Lucky Corner, 116th Street & Lexington Avenue, Manhattan. 1:00 PM — The Committee on Governmental Operations holds an oversight hearing on the Mayor's 2017 Management Report. Committee Room, City Hall, Manhattan.

De Blasio Talks School Safety, Malliotakis on Traffic Lights: Campaign Schedules for Oct. 2

9:30 AM — Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis, Republican nominee for mayor, holds press conference on Smart Light Technology with City Councilman Steve Matteo. Smart Light Technology combines traditional traffic lights with high tech sensors and artificial intelligence to create a traffic control system that measures traffic flow and instantaneously adjusts the timing of the traffic lights to manage changing traffic patterns, ease congestion and reduce accidents and emissions. Targee Street & Narrows Rd North, Staten Island. Approximately 10:00 AM — Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito conducts live interview on MSNBC Live with Hallie Jackson Airs to Discuss Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria Relief Efforts. 10:30 AM – Mayor de Blasio and schools Chancellor Carmen Farina participate in a Community Conversation on School Safety.

De Blasio’s Ethics Record; A Look Back at ConCon ’67: Headlines for Oct. 23

“There's a Trump-like quality in his whining about the media. He's got the same disease as the president.”
– Baruch College Professor Doug Muzzio on Mayor de Blasio
* * * *
50 Years Ago, a Con Con Ended Disastrously
WNYC
“Today, even people who praise these progressive proposals concede the convention was largely a failure — and not just because voters ended up rejecting the amendment package 70 percent to 30 percent. But students of state history disagree over what lessons to draw from that failure. The debate is more important than ever this fall, for New Yorkers will once again decide whether to hold another such convention. Supporters of voting ‘Yes' on the November ballot say the pitfalls of 1967 can be avoided; those who urge a ‘No' vote argue the very same problems that plagued the convention then will take place again.”

* * * *
The Mayor's Spotty Record on Ethics and Transparency
Gotham Gazette
“De Blasio rode into power promising the most transparent administration in the city's history, but his nearly four years in office have been marked by continuing questions and controversies over both his administration's opaqueness and ethics, highlighted by twin law enforcement investigations into fundraising practices and government favors for campaign donors.

Dead animals found in South Hero home

Ashleigh M. Tillson, 30, is due in Vermont Superior Court on Oct. 19. Courtesy of the Islander.SOUTH HERO — A South Hero woman is facing animal cruelty charges after 80 dead animals were found in her trailer on South Street, the Grand Isle County Sheriff's Department said Wednesday. Ashleigh M. Tillson, 30, is due in Vermont Superior Court in North Hero on Oct. 19, Sheriff Ray Allen said.

Deadline Extended to Comment on Inwood Rezoning Scope

Draft Scope of Work for the Inwood Rezoning ProposalA map from the Draft Scope of Work indicating red projected development sites (most likely) and blue potential development sites (less likely) by the year 2032. On Monday, the de Blasio administration agreed to extend for a second time the due date for submitting comments on an important document related to its proposed rezoning of Inwood. Comments are now due on Friday October 13 at 5 p.m.
That gives community members and the community board additional time—though not quite as much time as the board asked for—to review and discuss the draft scope of work, a document which provides detail about the rezoning as well as outlines the methodology that will be used to assess the project's potential environmental effects. The extension can be viewed as an act of diplomacy on the part of the de Blasio administration regarding a proposal that has been controversial in the community. According to a letter sent by Hilary Semel, an assistant to the mayor, to the chair of community board 12, the comments were originally due on Monday, September 25.

Dean Whitlock: Marijuana panel left some questions hanging

Editor's note: This commentary is by Dean Whitlock, of Thetford, a freelance writer who has been researching the issues surrounding marijuana legalization for years. A former supporter of legalization, he is now opposed. He is a member of Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM-VT)
The panel on marijuana legalization that was hosted on Sept. 18 by Burlington's Howard Center presented some very interesting new information about the effects of legalization. The entire event has been archived on YouTube here, but viewers should know that there are four statements that need more clarification or correction than time allowed during the discussion afterward.

Death Penalty Out for TX Man After Race Charges

Duane Buck, whose death sentence in a 1995 double slaying was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court after allegations of racist testimony from an expert witness, had his sentence reduced to life in prison Tuesday after reaching a plea agreement with prosecutors, the Texas Tribune reports. Buck, 54, was sentenced to death after killing his ex-girlfriend and her friend in Houston. Last week, the Harris County District Attorney's Office added two new charges of attempted murder. Under the agreement, Buck pleaded guilty to those new charges and was sentenced to two terms of 60 years in prison, in exchange for the district attorney's agreeing to drop its pursuit of the death penalty for the 1995 killings. Buck's attorneys argued that his initial sentencing hearing was prejudiced because an expert witness had claimed Buck was more likely to be a future danger because he is black.

Death row inmate gets new sentencing hearing because lawyer refused to present his case

The lawyer of a man sentenced to death for killing his two young children predicted that the case would be back in court 10 years later. She was off by a year. Nine years ago, Hector Medina was convicted of capital murder in Dallas County after he fatally shot his 8-month-old daughter and 3-year-old son in March 2007. On Wednesday, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals granted him a new sentencing hearing, where he will fight for the alternative to a death sentence — life without parole. The court ruled Medina didn't get a fair trial in 2008 because his lawyer refused to present a defense at the punishment phase, the part of the trial after a capital murder conviction where jurors weigh factors that will lead either to a death or life sentence.

Debate over police shootings raises questions of policy versus tactics

Use-of-force policies for both the St. Louis Metropolitan Police and St. Louis County Police departments say officers can shoot someone to “protect themselves or others from what is reasonably believed to be an imminent threat of death or serious physical injury.” Protesters who have been marching throughout greater St. Louis, demanding greater police accountability for more than a month, say those policies give officers too much leeway. They want more limits on when officers can draw and fire their weapons.

Debate Tonight: Official Schedules for Oct. 10

9:00 AM — Comptroller Scott Stringer hosts annual Polish Heritage Breakfast. Polish & Slavic Center, 177 Kent Street, Brooklyn. 9:30 AM — The City Council Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will hold a hearing on
several items. Council Chambers, City Hall, Manhattan. Live video here. 1:00 PM — The City Council Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions, and Concessions will hold a hearing on several items. Committee Room, City Hall, Manhattan.

Decertifying the Iran deal would be another unforced error by the Trump administration

Mark Porubcansky

President Trump is about to show Iran how tough he is – by shooting himself in the foot.By “decertifying” the Obama administration's nuclear deal with Iran, which Trump is expected to do in coming days, he gets to take a whack at another pillar of Barack Obama's legacy. He also get to sort of fulfill a campaign promise — and then hand the mess to someone else.The move is also likely to isolate the U.S., cause confusion about its intentions, permit Iran to claim the high ground in any push to renegotiate, and provide both allies and adversaries with more evidence that the United States can't be trusted.The 2015 deal lifted sanctions against Iran in exchange for limits on its nuclear program. Iran's compliance is being monitored by the United Nations, which has declared that the Islamic Republic is sticking by the letter of its obligations. No one regards the agreement as ideal. But Obama calculated that it was better to stop Iran temporarily than face the problem of what to do once it was on the cusp of possessing a nuclear weapon.

DEEP taking heat on its proposed changes to solar policy

Provisions in the Connecticut Comprehensive Energy Strategy that would drastically limit the number of solar systems people and businesses can put on their roofs and could change the payment structure for excess electricity those systems generate have riled the state's solar industry and those who support it.

Deforestation drops 16% in the Brazilian Amazon

Deforestation in the world's largest rainforest declined over the past year, reports the Brazilian government. According to preliminary data from Brazil's national space agency INPE, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon amounted to 6,624 square kilometers (2,558 square miles) between August, 1 2016 and July 31, 2017. The loss is equivalent to 112 Manhattans or half the U.S. state of Maryland, but is 16 percent lower than the prior year period when 7,893 square kilometers were chopped down. The decline in deforestation was not unexpected. Near-term tracking data from both the Brazilian government and the NGO Imazon showed markedly lower rates of loss on a month by month basis over the past year.

Defunct Land Deals’ Revival Hits Roadblock

A plan to allow a developer to amend his defunct land disposition agreement hit the skids and touched off a debate about whether any developer who failed to live up to such an agreement should get a second chance.

Delegation backs ban on rapid-fire gun device used in Vegas

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks in favor of a bill to ban so-called bump stocks. Photo by Elizabeth Hewitt/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?fit=300%2C220&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?fit=610%2C448&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?resize=610%2C448&ssl=1" alt="bernie sanders" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?resize=610%2C448&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?resize=125%2C92&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?resize=300%2C220&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?resize=768%2C564&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/bernie-zoom.png?w=1024&ssl=1 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks in Washington in favor of a bill to ban so-called bump stocks. Photo by Elizabeth Hewitt/VTDiggerWASHINGTON — In the wake of the shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 people dead and hundreds injured, more than two dozen senators are backing a bill to crack down on a device that allowed the gunman to fire continuously. From a room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock rained a steady stream of bullets down on a crowd of 22,000 people attending a country music festival. Twelve of the 23 weapons law enforcement found in Paddock's hotel room were outfitted with bump stocks — devices that can be attached to semi-automatic rifles to dramatically increase their rate of fire.

Delivering the best fan experience around, Lynx deserve more fanfare, fewer slights

I am amazed at how the Minnesota Lynx continue to be gracious in spite of the disrespect they frequently experience. Their championship game was electrifying, and I will remember the excitement and pride of being there for a long time. I was disappointed, however, at a few of the unfair slights I observed around the game.The night of Game 5 between the Lynx and the Sparks, there was no indication outside that a league championship game was happening in Williams Arena. There was no fanfare, no inflatables or signs. I imagine the scene will look different for the big game we're hosting in February.When I arrived home, I was excited from the win and ready to make my first licensed apparel purchase in years.

Delta conference brings academics, musicians to the home of the Blues

Kelsey Davis, Mississippi TodayJohn Szwed gives the keynote speech at Delta State University's annual International Conference on the Blues. CLEVELAND — Perhaps Alan Lomax's greatest contribution to storytelling was letting the South speak for itself, John Szwed said to a room full of Blues academics this week. “I think everyone knows there are terrific complexities of culture and mysteries in the South. Lomax certainly did,” Szwed said during his keynote presentation Delta State University's annual International Conference on the Blues. Lomax's goal was to capture that heritage.

Delta Hot Tamales: Clues to the secret of their success

Locals and world-travelers who enter the White Front Café/Joe's Hot Tamale Place all come for the same thing — legendary hot tamales made famous by the late Joe Pope. They are part of a tradition in the Delta, one that Joe's sister, Barbara Pope, is carrying on in the white clapboard building in Rosedale, a small community on the banks of the Mississippi River, just west of Cleveland. Like most folks who make hot tamales, Barbara never aspired to run a hot tamale business. The beloved treat just somehow claimed her as it did the small circle of tamale people in the Delta. A Mississippi tourism booklet has even called the tamale one of the more unexpected official state delicacies.

Democratic governors boost funding for schools with more black, Hispanic students. (Test scores, not so much.)

Elections have consequences, goes the common saying — and that turns out to be true in schools. A new study finds that electing a Democrat for governor leads to more money being spent in districts with more students of color, though there's no evidence that meant higher test scores or smaller achievement gaps. “School districts with a high share of minority students receive significantly greater transfers from the state government than other districts when a Democrat is elected,” write researchers Andrew Hill and Daniel Jones in the peer-reviewed Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization. It's one of only a few studies to directly examine how politicians' partisan affiliation affects education policy. Another recent analysis found that Democratic school board members in North Carolina led to more racially integrated schools.

Democratic lawmaker faces $3 million legal malpractice judgment

Texas state Rep. Sergio Muñoz Jr. owes a legal company nearly $3 million after a federal judge ruled against the Democratic lawyer from Palmview in a malpractice case. Muñoz was sued in 2014 by Law Funder LLC, which helps clients fund lawsuits and provides clients cash advances for pending litigation. The company claimed in court documents that it hired Muñoz to handle a divorce case in Hidalgo County, but Muñoz didn't disclose to the company that he had a business relationship with the state district judge in the case. The judge was eventually removed from the case, and all his orders were voided, documents say. Law Funder said in a court filing that it suffered "a significant amount of damages" as a result.
Muñoz denied committing malpractice, but a federal district judge ruled against him in February, saying any responsible person in Muñoz's position "would know that failing to disclose or withdraw from the conflict in question could lead to disqualification of [the judge in the divorce case], nullification of his orders, and the consequent waste of [Law Funder's] time and paid attorney's fees."

Democrats make final payment on $325K settlement

The Connecticut Democratic Party says it paid $155,000 to the state Friday, completing its payments on a $325,000 settlement reached in 2016 with the State Elections Enforcement Commission.

Democrats say Trump’s plan to tie DACA deal to border wall dead on arrival

The day after President Donald Trump released a list of immigration issues that must be negotiated before he'll consider legislation that protects young undocumented immigrants, one of the the country's largest immigrant advocacy groups criticized it as a ransom note that places hundreds of thousands of people at risk. In a surprise announcement Sunday night, the White House announced it wouldn't move forward with a legal remedy for so-called Dreamers unless it also includes increased interior enforcement of undocumented immigrants, funding for a border wall and a mandate for businesses to use E-Verify, a federal service that allows employers to screen to ensure job applicants are legally allowed to work in the country. Meanwhile, Democratic leaders in Congress said Monday that any deal that uses immigrants as a bargaining chip are “dead on arrival.”
The White House announcement came just three days after a deadline for tens of thousands of eligible applicants to renew their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, status. The administration announced last month it was phasing out the Obama-era program that has shielded about 800,000 undocumented immigrants from deportation. That figure includes about 124,000 Texans.

Democrats weighing strategy for challenge to Paulsen

MinnPost staff

MPR with a look at Democratic politics in CD3. Brian Bakst writes: “John and Susan Prin are the kind of voters Democrats will need to win over next year if they are to break a 29-election losing streak in Minnesota's suburban 3rd Congressional District. … The Eden Prairie couple has cast past votes for Republican Rep. Erik Paulsen. The self-declared independents say they appreciated his work on policy related to pulmonary fibrosis, a lung disease that claimed their daughter this year at age 42. … ‘He fought for her health care,' Susan Prin said. ‘But I'm seeing a different Erik Paulsen now, and that's really sad.'

Democrats: Trump’s Plan to Tie DACA Deal to Border Wall Dead on Arrival

Non-starter. Dead on Arrival. That's how Democrats and Dreamers are describing a list of immigration policies the White House released Sunday evening. The post Democrats: Trump's Plan to Tie DACA Deal to Border Wall Dead on Arrival appeared first on Rivard Report.

Dennis Noll To Retire as CEO of San Antonio Area Foundation

Under Noll's leadership, the Area Foundation has more than tripled in size, from managing $211 million in assets in 2011 to $900 million in assets in 2017. The post Dennis Noll To Retire as CEO of San Antonio Area Foundation appeared first on Rivard Report.

Denver DA launches grand jury probe into handling of Taser in preacher’s killing

Denver prosecutors are launching a grand jury investigation into the handling of the weapon that city sheriff's deputies used in 2010 to kill a homeless street preacher in the city jail. Today's announcement by District Attorney Beth McCann comes after strong urging by Marvin Booker's family and members of Denver's civil rights community to investigate whether the officers responsible switched out the Taser to conceal an excessive use of force and whether top city officials have let them get away with it. Mayor Michael Hancock's administration long has failed to account for – or apparently look into – why the stun gun it relied on in its inquiries of Booker's homicide was deployed more than a half-hour after he was shocked. “DA McCann is on the right track toward getting justice for Marvin,” says Pastor Spencer Booker, one of Booker's brothers. “We've known all the time that the Taser was missing and never came to trial.

Denver DA launches grand jury probe into handling of Taser in preacher’s killing

Denver prosecutors are launching a grand jury investigation into the handling of the weapon that city sheriff's deputies used in 2010 to kill a homeless street preacher in the city jail. Today's announcement by District Attorney Beth McCann comes after strong urging by Marvin Booker's family and members of Denver's civil rights community to investigate whether the officers responsible switched out the Taser to conceal an excessive use of force and whether top city officials have let them get away with it. Mayor Michael Hancock's administration long has failed to account for – or apparently look into – why the stun gun it relied on in its inquiries of Booker's homicide was deployed more than a half-hour after he was shocked. “DA McCann is on the right track toward getting justice for Marvin,” says Pastor Spencer Booker, one of Booker's brothers. “We've known all the time that the Taser was missing and never came to trial.

Denver organization to launch national prize for early childhood innovation

A Denver-based investment group will soon launch a national contest meant to help scale up great ideas in the early childhood field — specifically efforts focused on children birth to 3 years old. Gary Community Investments announced its Early Childhood Innovation Prize on Wednesday morning at a conference in San Francisco. It's sort of like the television show “Shark Tank,” but without the TV cameras, celebrity judges and nail-biting live pitch. The contest will divvy up $1 million in prize money to at least three winners, one at the beginning stages of concept development, one at a mid-level stage and one at an advanced stage. Gary officials say there could be more than one winner in each category.

Denver-based University Prep charter school network wins federal grant, opening expansion possibilities

Denver charter school operator University Prep has won a nearly $1.4 million federal grant this year as part of a U.S. Department of Education program that helps bankroll the expansion and replication of successful charter schools. University Prep, which operates two Denver elementary schools, was the sole Colorado recipient in a series of charter school growth grants announced Thursday. The education department recommended that University Prep receive a total of $3.7 million through the program, contingent on congressional approval in future years. With a student population that is overwhelmingly Latino and low-income, University Prep opened its first campus, on Arapahoe Street just north of downtown, in 2010. Last year, its fourth- and fifth-graders outperformed district averages on both the English and math tests.

Denver, Boulder schools home to the state’s largest achievement gaps based on race, new data shows

Since Colorado introduced new, more challenging state math and English tests in 2015, schools and families have seen a steady — and often slow — trickle of results. Now, the Colorado Department of Education is making available two years' worth of test scores showing achievement gaps within districts and schools. The data show wide differences between how different student groups score — for example, gaps separating black and Hispanic students from white students, or students with special needs from other students, or students who qualify for subsidized lunches and those who don't. On Monday, state officials quietly posted district- and school-level scores broken by student subgroups for the 2016 and 2017 tests. What took so long?

Denver, Boulder schools home to the state’s largest achievement gaps based on race, new data shows

Since Colorado introduced new, more challenging state math and English tests in 2015, schools and families have seen a steady — and often slow — trickle of results. Now, the Colorado Department of Education is making available two years' worth of test scores showing achievement gaps within districts and schools. The data show wide differences between how different student groups score — for example, gaps separating black and Hispanic students from white students, or students with special needs from other students, or students who qualify for subsidized lunches and those who don't. On Monday, state officials quietly posted district- and school-level scores broken by student subgroups for the 2016 and 2017 tests. What took so long?

Depleted Education Fund makes tax increase likely

As school boards start to budget for next year, the forecast for school spending is grim. The state's education fund is wiped out after using a significant amount of one time money and spending down reserves to keep property taxes lower. At the local level, school districts used up rainy day funds in last year to avoid triggering tax penalties. Vermonters are looking at a 7 to 9-cent tax increase, at least, unless the state can find millions of dollars in cuts, according to Secretary Rebecca Holcombe. “I'm increasingly concerned about the fiscal situation in the state,” Holcombe said.

DEQ rejects Ramaco Brook mine permit — for now

Wyoming regulators rejected a permit application for what could become the leading coal state's first new mine in decades. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality this week reversed its previous decision to approve the application filed by Ramaco Resources Inc. for the Brook mine near Sheridan. The agency based its decision to require additional information on the conclusions reached by the Wyoming Environmental Quality Council in August. Kentucky-based Ramaco has big plans for the Brook mine to supply coal for a proposed research park specializing in turning coal into carbon fiber for manufacturing cars (Greenwire, July 31). But the mine permit was challenged by landowners and rival coal company Lighthouse Resources Inc.'s Big Horn Coal Co., which owns the surface rights above the proposed site.

DEQ rejects Ramaco Brook mine permit — for now

Wyoming regulators rejected a permit application for what could become the leading coal state's first new mine in decades. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality this week reversed its previous decision to approve the application filed by Ramaco Resources Inc. for the Brook mine near Sheridan. The agency based its decision to require additional information on the conclusions reached by the Wyoming Environmental Quality Council in August. Kentucky-based Ramaco has big plans for the Brook mine to supply coal for a proposed research park specializing in turning coal into carbon fiber for manufacturing cars (Greenwire, July 31). But the mine permit was challenged by landowners and rival coal company Lighthouse Resources Inc.'s Big Horn Coal Co., which owns the surface rights above the proposed site.

Designing The Future Of Healthcare With Stephen Klasko

Dr. Stephen Klasko wants to disrupt traditional hospital care and integrate medicine into our everyday life. Through service and information delivery systems similar to Netflix, Apple stores, Google Brain, and virtual reality, the president and CEO of Jefferson Healthcare System believes the future of our well being lies in smart design. Contributor Hilary Jay, founder of DesignPhiladelphia, sits down with Dr. Klasko to discuss breaking the status quo of the medical industry with user-minded health care

Despite Losses, Puerto Rican Journalists Keep Reporting After Hurricane Maria

International and Puerto Rican media have set up shop in the Puerto Rico Convention Center, creating a de facto newsroom in the same building where officials give press conferences and citizens look for resources. Aside from Internet and cell service, it is the place to find all government sources who will provide updates on efforts to help the 95 percent of Puerto Ricans without power, as well as the thousands without food, water, fuel and medical help. The team from GIJN's member in Puerto Rico, the Centro de Periodismo Investigativo, reports from the battered island's Convention Center. (Credit: Carla Minet)

On Monday, Sept. 25, five days after Hurricane María hit the island's southern coast, they all were finally able to gather in San Juan to assess what happened and figure out how to report in the new scenario.

Despite Trump promises, uncertainty reigns in Ohio communities near coal plants

A plan by the Trump administration to rescue uneconomic coal plants has done little to ease the pall of anxiety hanging over two Ohio River counties. By next June, Dayton Power and Light (DP&L) will close two coal-fired plants in Adams County, Ohio — the 2,318-megawatt coal-fired J.M. Stuart Station, opened in 1971, and the 618-megawatt Killen Station, started 11 years later. Less than a year after DP&L announced its closure plan, 100 people have left a workforce that counted 500 union, management, and contractor employees that operated the two stations. Many of them earned $100,000 or more annually, said Kelly Cooper, the former president of the Utility Workers Union of America Local 175. County officials say almost a fifth of their $8.2 million budget will be lost.

Detroit Chief Cites Crime Progress, Disputes FBI

Detroit Police Chief James Craig said there's been a double-digit reduction in violent crime since he came to the city in 2013, but the improvement is not always easy for residents to process, the Detroit News reports. “If you've been a victim of a crime, or you have a friend or relative who have been victims, you're not going to feel safe,” Craig said. “The hard-working, good people in the neighborhoods sometimes feel like there's nothing happening, when that's not the case.” Since 2013, violent crime is down more than 11 percent. The city still averages about six killings and 20 shootings weekly. FBI data released last month show violent crime in Detroit surged 15.7 percent last year, an increase that ranked it as the nation's most violent big city.

Detroit’s first State of the Schools address aims to ‘bring all the parties to the table’  

There's a State of the Union address, a State of the State address and a State of the City address. Now, Detroiters will have a State of the Schools address. “We thought it was important to do something just about schools,” said Jamila Martin, co-director of 482Forward, a citywide network of parents, students and educators that is sponsoring the first of what it hopes will be an annual event. The State of the Schools will feature presentations from Detroit schools Superintendent Nikolai Vitti as well as the leaders of two charter school authorizers — Grand Valley State University and Central Michigan University — that collectively oversee 25 of the city's 60-plus charter schools. All three speakers have been asked to bring data on their schools in a format that will allow for easy comparisons.

Devastated by Hurricane Irma

Former Garrison resident loses everythingDevastated by Hurricane Irma was first posted on October 14, 2017 at 8:43 am.

Developers Release Renderings for Former Merchants Ice Building

TRTF on Wednesday released early-concept renderings of a forthcoming live, work, and play complex on San Antonio's Eastside. The post Developers Release Renderings for Former Merchants Ice Building appeared first on Rivard Report.

Devices Like Fitbit Provide Evidence to Police

Richard Dabate of Connecticut told police that a masked intruder killed his wife, Connie. Police found no suspect but they did find a Fitbit tracking Connie's movements, which they say showed that Richard's story was an elaborately staged fiction. the Washington Post reports that the case, which is in pretrial motions, is an example “of how Internet-connected, data-collecting smart devices such as fitness trackers, digital home assistants, thermostats, TVs and even pill bottles are beginning to transform criminal justice.” The ubiquitous devices can serve as witnesses, capturing people's every move, biometrics and what they have ingested. The devices sometimes listen in or watch people in the privacy of our homes. Police are increasingly looking to them for clues.

DFR Commissioner Pieciak to head international securities organization

News Release — Vermont Department of Financial Regulation
Oct. 4, 2017
Contact:
Dale Schaft, Information Management Officer, 802-828-4872
MONTPELIER, Vt. – Michael S. Pieciak, commissioner of the Vermont Department of Financial Regulation, was named president-elect of the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) last week at the NASAA annual conference in Seattle. Pieciak will serve as president-elect for one year and begin his term as president in September 2018. NASAA is the oldest international organization dedicated to investor protection.

Diane Follis (1941-2017)

Cold Spring resident was former county finance supervisorDiane Follis (1941-2017) was first posted on October 6, 2017 at 5:47 pm.

Diary of A Reluctant Dreamer: An Interview with Alberto Ledesma

Editor's Note: Besides working as a Diversity Director at UC Berkeley — from where he graduated three times over — Alberto Ledesma has also published academic articles and poetry, and four previous short stories. He has been a faculty member at CSU Northridge, Monterey Bay, and UC Berkeley. His essays have appeared in ColorLines and New America Media. He has also participated in Sandra Cisneros's Macondo Workshop and in the VONA Writers Workshop. His latest book, Diary of a Reluctant Dreamer, is a series of visual vignettes — drawings and prose — that focus on his experience as an undocumented immigrant student during the early 1980s.

Disaster food program extension draw thousands of Harvey victims in Houston

Thousands of Hurricane Harvey victims gathered in Houston today to apply for food stamps, after the emergency program that grants them was extended for three days, several news organizations reported. People waited for hours in lines or in heavy traffic that formed outside Deussen Park in northeast Houston, the only site designated to receive the applications, which must be submitted in person. State officials decided to reopen the Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or D-SNAP, between Wednesday and Friday this week. After Harvey, the program had been open for 15 days and served 634,400 people, according to Click2Houston. According to KHOU, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, who advocated for the extension, criticized Harris County Judge Ed Emmett for not designating more application sites.

Discipline disparities: How some Minnesota schools are working to reduce them

Erin Hinrichs

The majority of the students in Jennifer Christensen's kindergarten class at Prodeo Academy are black and qualify for free-and-reduced-price lunch. There's little racial diversity at this Minneapolis K-4 charter school, where the student body is nearly three-quarters black, 14 percent Hispanic and only 3 percent white. Given Prodeo's demographic breakdown, it'd be hard to pinpoint any significant racial discipline disparities within the walls of the school.But when Christensen and a handful of her colleagues considered how students of color across Minnesota are disproportionately impacted by exclusionary discipline practices — things like in-school suspension, out-of-school suspension and expulsion — they suspected their students were being impacted as well.For instance, statewide, black students make up just 11 percent of the student population. Yet they accounted for 41 percent of all suspensions during the 2015-16 school year. A significant portion of these suspensions are for nonviolent infractions like attendance or willful defiance, a subjective category that disproportionately impacts students of color.Christensen, along with three of her colleagues, approached the school's leaders for permission to access and review every classroom teacher's discipline data.

Discretion, interpretation at heart of St. Louis police use of force policy for protests

Police departments are standing by their officers' response to protesters after days of civil disobedience throughout the St. Louis region. Although three lawsuits have been filed against the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, officials are confident the majority of their officers complied with the department's use-of-force policy, which establishes guidelines, though one area law professor argues those guidelines are up for interpretation.

Dismantling of Confederate Memorial marks the end of two years of promises, planning and protests

Former St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said he'd take down the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park in 2015. That didn't happen, so it fell to Mayor Lyda Krewson, who promised a plan to get it done almost as soon as she took office in April. Two months later, the 32-foot-tall granite and bronze memorial is being taken apart — slowly, as some pieces weigh as much as 40 tons. Some say the credit for the quick action doesn't belong to Krewson but rather members of the community who've been vocal in recent weeks.

Distant horror felt acutely in Connecticut

The mass murder of 58 people and wounding of more than 500 others in Las Vegas last week was felt deeply in Connecticut, where people's lives were irrevocably stained by the deaths of 26 school children and their teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School five years ago.

District 1: The Race Not to Displace

Twitter headshot, William AlatristeChristopher Marte and Councilmember Margaret Chin
City Council District 1 has been in the news for weeks. It was home to one of the city's most hotly contested Democratic primary races. Community activist Christopher Marte, who lost the primary by just 222 votes to incumbent Margaret Chin, is now running on the Independent Party line in the November 7 general election. Both campaigns have been on the offensive, with Chin accusing staff affiliated with the Marte campaign of voter fraud and harassment—claims that Marte denies. From the beginning, gentrification and over-development have been the top issues in the race.

Diwali festival set to light up Seattle Center

The Vedic Cultural Center is organizing the free event at Seattle Center. (Photo courtesy Vedic Cultural Center.)South Asian grooves and an abundance of food, costumes and games will light up Seattle Center this Saturday, as the center hosts its annual Diwali celebration. “Diwali: Lights of India” begins at noon and is part of the Seattle Center's “Festál” series of 24 ethnic-cultural celebrations throughout the year. Admission is free. The Vedic Cultural Center is organizing the free event at Seattle Center.

Dizzie Pocket Doesn’t Waste Any Time

On “Time,” the second song from Dizzie Pocket's eponymous debut release, MC Jesse Ledeatte greets us over soothing chords from an electric piano.Dizzie Pocket by Dizzie Pocket“See, time never stops,” he says. “So neither can we.”

DMV chief Ide retiring after nearly decade at helm

DMV Commissioner Rob Ide, Col. Jake Elovirta, and ACLU-VT staff attorney Jay Diaz (from left) testify in Senate Government Operations. Photo by Elizabeth Hewitt/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?fit=300%2C218&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?fit=610%2C444&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?resize=610%2C444&ssl=1" alt="Rob Ide" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?resize=610%2C444&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?resize=125%2C91&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?resize=300%2C218&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?resize=768%2C559&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?resize=150%2C109&ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/dmv.png?w=1024&ssl=1 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" data-recalc-dims="1">DMV Commissioner Rob Ide, from left, Col. Jake Elovirta, and Vermont ACLU staff attorney Jay Diaz. File photo by Elizabeth Hewitt/VTDiggerMotor Vehicles Commissioner Rob Ide said Thursday he will retire in December after eight years leading the department.

Do ‘good’ parents prep their kids for gifted exams? The answer varies by race, study finds

Is getting your child into a gifted-and-talented program a mark of good parenting? How you answer may depend largely on your race or ethnicity, according to new research. Allison Roda, an assistant professor of education at Molloy College in Long Island, interviewed more than 50 white, black, and Hispanic parents at an unidentified New York City school to learn about their attitudes towards gifted programs. (Her sample did not include any Asian parents.)
She found that the white parents view applying for gifted programs and preparing their children to score well on the admissions test as hallmarks of good parenting. For the black and Hispanic families, being a good parent had more to do with choosing a diverse classroom for their child and not “gaming” the system by practicing for the gifted test, according to the report, which appeared recently in the peer-reviewed journal Teachers College Record. The report comes as the education department and elected officials are considering how to enroll more students of color in gifted programs.
In New York City, most gifted programs are housed in separate classrooms within a larger school.

Do state takeovers work in Mississippi?

As Mississippi considers a takeover of the Jackson Public schools, The Hechinger Report looks at data to show whether state takeovers are effective or not. Read the story here. The post Do state takeovers work in Mississippi? appeared first on Mississippi Today.

Do the Twin Cities really need another Target store?

Is there room for one more Target store in the Twin Cities? Minneapolis-based retailer Target Corp. believes so. It's newest local store opens Wednesday, October 18, in the Uptown area of south Minneapolis. The 21,410-square-foot store is located on the ground level of the new Revel apartment building, which was developed by Minneapolis-based CPM Companies.The Uptown location is one of 12 new Target store openings this week: 11 small-format stores and a standard big box store opening in Honolulu.

Docs Get Up to Speed on Opioid Prescribing

By Rose Hoban
As the number of people overdosing on opioids continues to climb in North Carolina, people who prescribe these painkillers in the state are learning how best to do that. In part, it's because they have to. Over the past three years, the General Assembly has passed a series of laws that will improve the state's Controlled Substances Reporting System, a database of all prescriptions for opioids and other drugs that can be abused. The legislature has also compelled prescribers to sign up for the system and more recently has ordered providers to take a continuing education course that improves their knowledge of best practices for writing opioid prescriptions. Primary care physician Joey Prucha urged attendees at the Duke opioid education session to ask their patients many questions before prescribing opioids.

Docs Get Up to Speed on Opioid Prescribing

By Rose Hoban
As the number of people overdosing on opioids continues to climb in North Carolina, people who prescribe these painkillers in the state are learning how best to do that. In part, it's because they have to. Over the past three years, the General Assembly has passed a series of laws that will improve the state's Controlled Substances Reporting System, a database of all prescriptions for opioids and other drugs that can be abused. The legislature has also compelled prescribers to sign up for the system and more recently has ordered providers to take a continuing education course that improves their knowledge of best practices for writing opioid prescriptions. Primary care physician Joey Prucha urged attendees at the Duke opioid education session to ask their patients many questions before prescribing opioids.

Doctors Without Borders calls US bombing of its hospital a crime against humanity

The Pentagon changed its story today, and the humanitarian group demanded an independent international inquiry.Doctors Without Borders is calling the incident a crime against humanity.“Under the rules of international humanitarian law, a hospital is a hospital and the people inside are patients — to target a medical facility in this way is a violation of that, whatever the circumstances,” Vickie Hawkins, executive director of the UK branch of Doctors Without Borders, tells The Takeaway. “The statements that have been coming out of the Afghan government in the past 24 hours would lead us to believe that there was some kind of intent behind the attack. We can only presume, on this basis, that that constitutes a war crime.” The US says the strike in Kunduz, which is under investigation, was issued after Afghan forces came under fire near the hospital and then called for help.“An airstrike was then called to eliminate the Taliban threat and several civilians were accidentally struck,” the American commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John F. Campbell,

Document: Opting out of national telecom plan could cost Vermont millions

A confidential draft memo circulating among state officials as Vermont prepares to decide whether to join a national public safety communications project is being likened by one member of a state review panel to a mafia protection racket. “I grew up in New Jersey,” said Ron Kumetz, a representative of volunteer firefighters to the Vermont Public Safety Broadband Commission. “There were certain family-owned businesses that would send around a ‘health adviser,' who would say, ‘If you decide to do business with us, it will be healthy for you, and if you refuse … it will be unhealthy for you.'”
Gov. Phil Scott speaks at Tony Pomerleau's 100th birthday party at the Lake Champlain Sailing Center in Burlington. Photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDigger
" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?fit=300%2C200&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?fit=610%2C407&ssl=1" src="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1" alt="Phil Scott" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?resize=300%2C200&ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?resize=125%2C83&ssl=1 125w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?resize=768%2C512&ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?resize=610%2C407&ssl=1 610w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/vtdigger.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/PhilScottPomerleau.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1">Gov. Phil Scott. File photo by Bob LoCicero/VTDiggerThe commission is due to make a recommendation to Gov. Phil Scott by November whether to opt into a plan by the federal FirstNet program to contract with telecom giant AT&T for public safety communications.

Documents detail concerns about Houston dams — before Harvey

The agency has long been criticized for providing few specifics on that issue, even after it found voids in the walls of the dams years ago, and classified them in 2009 as “unsafe” with an “urgent and compelling” need for action. Both dams withstood Hurricane Harvey's historic floods a month ago, but the Army Corps, which operates and maintains them, is offering little information about how the added stress may have affected the integrity of the dams — or how worried they were about them failing during the storm. The two earthen structures in west Houston, built by the Army Corps in the 1940s, are designed to hold floodwaters and protect central Houston — but only during major rainstorms. The land behind the dams is dry most of the time, dotted with parks, soccer fields and other recreational areas. Now both dams are holding back billions of gallons of floodwater from Harvey that will take months to safely release — something they weren't designed to do for more than short periods. “Addicks and Barker were not designed to impound large pools behind them for an extended period of time,” an Army Corps official wrote in a 2011 email, which was made public through a lawsuit the Sierra Club filed against the Corps over a road project near the reservoirs.

Documents detail concerns about Houston dams — before Harvey

Just how worried is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers about a possible failure of the Addicks and Barker dams? And how worried should Houston be? The agency has long been criticized for providing few specifics on that issue, even after it found voids in the walls of the dams years ago, and classified them in 2009 as "unsafe" with an "urgent and compelling" need for action. Both dams withstood Hurricane Harvey's historic floods a month ago, but the Army Corps, which operates and maintains them, is offering little information about how the added stress may have affected the integrity of the dams — or how worried they were about them failing during the storm. The two earthen structures in west Houston, built by the Army Corps in the 1940s, are designed to hold floodwaters and protect central Houston — but only during major rainstorms. The land behind the dams is dry most of the time, dotted with parks, soccer fields and other recreational areas.

Documents Detail Concerns About Houston Dams — Before Harvey

Just how worried is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers about a possible failure of the Addicks and Barker dams? And how worried should Houston be? The post Documents Detail Concerns About Houston Dams — Before Harvey appeared first on Rivard Report.

Documents Reveal How San Diego Unified Urges Struggling Students to Find New Schools

Genesees Romero knew she was struggling at Patrick Henry High, even before the guidance counselor called her into the office. With nearly 2,400 students, the school was just too big, Romero said. She couldn't focus. Her GPA stood at .56, documents show. Teachers seemed too busy and distracted to approach for help, she said.

Does a North Country activist have the power to keep a wind farm out of his town?

An energy developer with plans to build a big wind farm in rural St. Lawrence County recently got a surprise. Avangrid Renewables is getting ready to submit an application to build the North Ridge Wind Farm, with up to 40 turbines in Hopkinton and Parishville. The towns are deeply divided, but the final decision was supposed to rest with a state siting board. This summer, the state announced that an anti-wind activist from Parishville will get to sit on that board — raising big questions about what this process is meant to accomplish.

Does Labor’s resurgence in the U.K. say anything about U.S. politics?

Mark Porubcansky

Political conservatives are at war with themselves as they try to implement a policy championed by their nationalist, anti-immigrant wing. The consensus is that their unloved, error-prone party leader is on borrowed time. On the other side, there is energy and passion, fueled by strong support from young people drawn to an aging career legislator. Once dismissed as an ideologue stuck in a 1970s-era socialist utopia, he is now regarded by many as the country's most likely next leader.British politics don't completely parallel those in the United States. But there have been a lot of similarities in recent years.

Does Minneapolis’ minimum wage law treat franchise businesses unfairly?

Amid the long-simmering debate about a $15-per-hour minimum wage at Minneapolis City Hall, the fate of franchise businesses was largely off the radar. But when the dust settled, the ordinance defined franchises as a “large business” if the franchisor has more than 10 locations nationally. So they will have to boost wages faster.Franchise industry experts say that automatically declaring franchises large businesses suggests that city leaders don't understand franchise business basics. Franchisees are commonly local small-business owners; they pay a franchise fee to operate under the name of larger national brands.“Simply because they operate under a national banner does not mean they're large businesses,” says Jeff Hanscom, senior director of state government relations for the Washington D.C.-based International Franchise Association.Under the tiered phase-in schedules to reach the $15 wage, small businesses have seven years to implement the increases and large businesses have five years. Not counting franchises, Minneapolis defines a “large business” as any with 100 or more employees.The IFA sued Seattle in 2014 after the city's minimum wage law defined franchises as large businesses.

Does the time fit the crime?

This week on Reveal, we take a look at prisons as a part of our series And Justice for Some. The number of women in U.S. prisons has increased more than 700 percent since 1980. And for nearly all of that time, Oklahoma has led the nation in locking up women. Reveal Senior Editor Ziva Branstetter teams up with Allison Herrera and The Frontier, an Oklahoma-based investigative news website, to find out why. Reporter Stan Alcorn brings us the story of how one man went to prison for a crime he didn't commit.

Does Your Newsroom Need a Product Manager?

In 2015, Professor Cindy Royal dubbed product management “the new journalism,” predicting that media organizations would soon catch onto something she'd been mulling over for a while: that product management would be embraced as a “relevant and critical career path.” Turns out she was right. Newsrooms are starting to learn it's exactly the role that they didn't know they'd been missing. In the midst of a slew of new newsroom roles, the product manager drives the building of digital products like apps, bots, newsletters, and digital and data presentations. While those emerging from a legacy newsroom might continue to shrug off the role as “tech support,” Royal argues that “the audience-centric nature of these technology products makes them as much journalism as traditional stories.”
Publications like The Washington Post recently added new roles to standardize digital responsibilities, while October's ONA17 conference in Washington, D.C. dedicated a session — “We're ~Journalists~ Too: Embracing Your New(ish) Newsroom Role”— to the topic. GIJN member organizations and other innovative newsrooms around the world should take note.

Dogs Party In Edgewood Park

Feeling depressed after the election of Donald Trump, Yale Law School associate professor Marisol Orihuela decided this January to get a dog: a chihuaha mix that she planned to bring to local protests.

Dogs, dung, and DNA: mapping multi-species corridors to conserve threatened carnivores

Large forest carnivores rely on expanses of natural vegetation and enough prey to survive. Misiones province of northeastern Argentina has some of the larger remaining tracts of Atlantic Forest, but a low carnivore density. Continuing habitat loss, forest fragmentation from new roads, and wildlife poaching motivated a research team to find out where these species were still present and how to conserve them efficiently. The team combined high-tech and low-tech methods to map conservation corridors for five of the region's threatened carnivore species and published their results in the journal PLOS One. The mixed habitat landscape of central Misiones, Argentina and the newly designated biological corridor.

DOJ agent who blew the whistle in 2012 says experience ruined him

Broken Whistle explores Gov. Scott Walker's attack on waste, fraud and abuse and the dwindling protections and incentives for whistleblowers in Wisconsin. More from this series
Wisconsin's attack on waste and fraud leaves some whistleblowers, vulnerable residents behind
Wisconsin's congressional delegation seeks to both protect, curb whistleblowing

In 2012, Dan Bethards had been a special agent in the Wisconsin Department of Justice for 14 years. But his career and life were upended after he reported his direct supervisor and friend, Jay Smith, for making and selling firearms without a license — a possible federal offense. Since blowing the whistle on Smith, Bethards has been fired. He lost his home to foreclosure.

DOJ Bolsters Project Safe Neighborhoods To Fight Crime

As violent crime rates continue to rise, the Justice Department is reviving a community-based effort to target local gangs and reduce gun crimes in hot spots across the U.S., reports USA Today. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, in a memo to the 94 U.S. Attorneys, said federal prosecutors' performance would be regularly measured on their re-commitment to the Project Safe Neighborhoods strategy, first introduced 16 years ago to combat violence by strengthening partnerships among law enforcement officials and community leaders. “We cannot afford to be complacent in the face of violence that threatens too many of our communities,” Sessions said Thursday. As part of the effort, the Justice Department is deploying 40 additional prosecutors to 20 of the country's most troubled districts. All U.S. Attorneys will be required to report on the progress every six months.

DOJ Cites ‘Sanctuary Policies’ in Four Places

The U.S. Justice Department singled out four cities and a county on Thursday for allegedly having so-called “sanctuary policies” that may violate a federal law that says local governments cannot limit information sharing with U.S. immigration officials, Reuters reports. The department said New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, and Cook County, Il., along with its largest city, Chicago, “have preliminarily been found” to have policies that violate the law. It is giving those jurisdictions until Oct. 27 to provide evidence demonstrating compliance. If the government finds the cities and county are violating the statute known as Section 1373, it could try to cut federal funds for law enforcement.

DOJ hosts private meetings on Cleveland school desegregation

Kelsey Davis, Mississippi TodayStudents load a Cleveland School District bus outside of the new Cleveland Central High School. CLEVELAND — Department of Justice attorneys visited Cleveland last week for the first time since the school district consolidated under a federal desegregation order. The goal of the visit was to monitor the district's compliance with the order issued in 2016, which mandated that East Side High School and Cleveland High School would be merged into one. According to a plan adopted by U.S. District Judge Debra Brown, the DOJ will monitor the district's compliance for at least three full school years. The plan involves numerous provisions, such as taking “affirmative steps to reflect the history of the two legacy high schools in the new District-wide high school,” forming a multi-racial committee to help implement the proposed plan and continuing to use that panel to engage the community on how to continue to improve the consolidation process.

DOJ sets deadline for jurisdictions to prove they’re not sanctuaries

The U.S. Justice Department announced this week that an official review found Connecticut and Milwaukee County, Wisc. were not shielding immigrants from deportation while giving so-called sanctuary cities two weeks to prove that local officials properly share information with immigration agents. In setting the October 27 deadline, the Justice Department said in a statement that it was the “last chance” for four cities and one county to show they are in compliance with federal immigration law. The law in question involves information sharing between local officials and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “Jurisdictions that adopt so-called ‘sanctuary policies' also adopt the view that the protection of criminal aliens is more important than the protection of law-abiding citizens and of the rule of law,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in a statement Thursday.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month: On connections, hope and healing

Estelle BrouwerFact: One in three U.S. women has been or will be a victim of domestic violence in her lifetime. Fact: a current or former spouse or significant other assaulted 1½ percent of Minnesotans in 2016, making intimate partner violence the second most common form of person offense victimization in Minnesota. Of those who reported having suffered domestic violence, 97 percent said it happened more than once. This month, the nation once again observes Domestic Violence Awareness Month as a way to mourn those who have died, celebrate those who have survived, and build connections among those who work to end violence. For those of us who have never experienced domestic violence, it can be easy to slip into assumptions.

Don Keelan: A guidebook for board members of nonprofits

Editor's note: This commentary is by Don Keelan, a certified public accountant and resident of Arlington. The piece first appeared in the Bennington Banner. The Vermont's Attorney General's Office will be publishing a 17-page handbook titled, “Understand Your Responsibilities,” subtitled, “Guidance for Board Members of Charitable Nonprofit Organizations in Vermont,” and available in late October. According to the publication's introductory letter by Vermont Attorney General Bill Sorrell, the publication is the product of two of his assistant attorneys general, Wendy Morgan and Todd Daloz, with additional assistance from Linnea Myers. Attorney General Sorrell notes the following in his letter:
“A good board provides leadership, vision, and wisdom to guide the nonprofit.

Don Keelan: The new best job in Vermont

Editor's note: This commentary is by Don Keelan, a retired certified public accountant and resident of Arlington. The piece first appeared in the Bennington Banner. I have often written on the subject of embezzlement and its impact in Vermont. I have even gone so far as to note that in some ways it is “the best job in Vermont.” I now stand corrected; the best job in Vermont is that of our state's U.S. senator. An embezzler does receive some significant benefits, but it is not without risks.

Don Keelan: Uncover the coverup

Editor's note: This commentary is by Don Keelan, a retired certified public accountant and resident of Arlington. The piece first appeared in the Bennington Banner. Gov. Phil Scott announced on Sept. 27 that he has not ruled out establishing a special prosecutor to delve into the massive fraud perpetrated on hundreds of investors and contractors in the Northeast Kingdom. It would have been more impressive to have heard that Gov. Scott and the leaders of the Vermont Legislature were naming a nonpartisan special prosecutor.

Don Rendall: Natural gas expansion boosts economy

Editor's note: This commentary is by Don Rendall, who is the president and CEO of Vermont Gas. Vermont Gas' Addison County customer expansion project has received its fair share of news coverage over the past few years and rightfully so: This has been a complex and, at times, very challenging project. Often missing in the many headlines about Vermont Gas are the tremendous benefits this project will bring to Vermont. Construction alone has pumped tens of millions of dollars into our state and local economies. Since early June, over 250 men and women – laborers, inspectors and contractors – have been hard at work six days a week building this important infrastructure project.

Don’t Leave San Diegans in the Dark on New Police Chief Hire

The top responsibility for local government is public safety. San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman is set to retire in March, and the city has already begun the process of choosing her successor. The city has spent several weeks gathering public input on priorities for our next chief, and will soon embark on a publicly funded, nationwide search to identify the best candidates for the job. Like Zimmerman, our next chief will be the leader of local law enforcement. This individual will be tasked with addressing some of SDPD's biggest challenges, such as shaping the department's culture during a time when community-police relations need improvement in some neighborhoods, training and deploying officers to serve and protect our diverse city and developing a strategy to recruit and retain quality police officers.

Dona Ana County maps out plan for early childhood education

Charlie Garcia is a bubbly 4-year-old with soft brown curls. Sitting down for a small group activity on a late-August afternoon at Alpha School in Las Cruces, she chatters with her teachers and friends. Sitting quietly nearby is Evelynn Aguirre McClure. Assistant teacher Brittany Polanco encourages the two girls and their classmate to build a […]

Donald Trump campaign ramps up 2020 re-election fundraising

New financial disclosures President Donald Trump's re-election committee filed Sunday with the Federal Election Commission tell a story of two Trump campaigns. On one end, Trump, both by choice and circumstance, remains tethered to his 2016 presidential election effort. A federal investigation is probing whether he or his political aides colluded with Russians, and Trump himself frequently skewers his Democratic foil, Hillary Clinton, as if he didn't defeat her in November. Trump's campaign committee this summer spent more than $1 million on legal bills, disclosures show — much ostensibly stemming from the Russia controversy. All the while, Trump is racing forward with unprecedented haste to win re-election in 2020.

Donations for Puerto Rico

Items being collected at Beacon City HallDonations for Puerto Rico was first posted on October 4, 2017 at 8:43 pm.

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Douglas County slate that favors continuing school voucher court case is ahead in early fundraising, records show

A group of candidates that largely supports the direction of the Douglas County School District, especially its embrace of school choice policies, has raised nearly $100,000 in campaign contributions, new financial records show. The group, which calls itself “Elevate Douglas County,” topped its competition, the “Community Matters” slate, by more than $30,000 in monetary contributions to committees for individual candidates. A lot is at stake in the south suburban Denver school board contest. A majority of seats on the seven-member school board are up for grabs, putting the philosophical direction of the state's third largest school district on the line. For eight years, the school board has pushed a conservative education reform agenda that included developing a voucher program that would allow parents to use tax dollars to send their children to private school and establishing a market-based pay system for teachers.

Douglas County slate that favors continuing school voucher court case is ahead in early fundraising, records show

A group of candidates that largely supports the direction of the Douglas County School District, especially its embrace of school choice policies, has raised nearly $100,000 in campaign contributions, new financial records show. The group, which calls itself “Elevate Douglas County,” topped its competition, the “Community Matters” slate, by more than $30,000 in monetary contributions to committees for individual candidates. A lot is at stake in the south suburban Denver school board contest. A majority of seats on the seven-member school board are up for grabs, putting the philosophical direction of the state's third largest school district on the line. For eight years, the school board has pushed a conservative education reform agenda that included developing a voucher program that would allow parents to use tax dollars to send their children to private school and establishing a market-based pay system for teachers.

Downtown Rochester Hyatt unveils $18 million renovation project

A number of officials gathered to mark a new chapter for the Hyatt Regency hotel in downtown Rochester on Thursday. They cut the ribbon on a more than $18 million renovation project. It includes improvements to the more than 340 rooms as well as new lounges, and a Starbucks, as well as a Morton's Steakhouse that will be opening soon. Mayor Lovely Warren says it's all part of the efforts to create more jobs in the city. “Many people worked on this, worked construction on this job, to repair the rooms, to renovate the rooms, but also all the people that work here on a daily basis not only to clean the rooms, but at the front desk, people working in restaurants, and other things like that, so this is really about what we're trying to do in the city of Rochester.” The Hyatt originally opened 25 years ago, and that was after a delay in construction of several years.